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Admiral_Atredies
15 December 2002, 02:42 PM
I posted this thread mainly because I'm interested in seeing what SW novels other people enjoyed the most and least. I'm mostly talking about New Republic onward time period here, but any others people liked are fine. So just post your favorites and least favorites and why.

Best: The Thrawn Trilogy. Frankly because it was the original EU that explored beyond the films, and started a whole new part of Star Wars. It was exiting, well-written (in my opinion at least), and overall captured alot of the feel the movies had. I just found it really neat.

Worst: OK, I know I'll probably be ridiculled and slandered because of this, but here it goes... The New Jedi Order. Not to say that others are much better, because it seemed to me like this is the pit of a slow decline in good-quality Star Wars novels that started a while back. To make an extremly long list of reasons short: I think that this series is just unbeleivable. Extragalactic invaders void of Force, Luke and Leia are still kickin, and we all know in the end, after everthing is done, Ben Skywalker will become YET ANOTHER all-powerful Jedi God, and every faction will make peace with each other to form the Ultra-Republic which will know no evil.

There are also some things I would like to see in upcoming novels, such as:Memorble, long lasting Pro and Antagonists (Other than Luke, Leia and evil Emporer clones). One thing the novels are missing is a solid base of new characters to replace the original guys. We need more long lasting characters that survive more than one book (EX:Mara Jade, Talon Karrde), and some bad guys that have nothing to do with the Force or the Empire.

Ok, these are just my humble opinions and I would like to see some others. :)

Danan Valos
15 December 2002, 03:06 PM
I do have to agree with you concerning the New Jedi Order books. They seem to be lacking something, because in the end we all now the good guys will win and the bad guys will lose. Evil is defeated and everybody lives happily ever after. I was even starting to like the series when it first started, but then they went and KILLED CHEWIE!! :mad: After that I stopped reading the books because I had always loved Chewbacca throughout the movies; I felt that the authors couldn't just go and kill him!

I think the best EU books was the Return of Thrawn Duology: Spectar of the Past and Vision of the Future. I don't know why they're my favorite, maybe because I've read them so many times.

Nova Spice
15 December 2002, 06:20 PM
Heh, well I think the NJO is hands down the best EU series. First let me address some of the comments above.


Worst: OK, I know I'll probably be ridiculled and slandered because of this, but here it goes... The New Jedi Order.

Ridiculed? No! Burned at the stake? Of course! :p Just kidding naturally.


To make an extremly long list of reasons short: I think that this series is just unbeleivable. Extragalactic invaders void of Force, Luke and Leia are still kickin, and we all know in the end, after everthing is done, Ben Skywalker will become YET ANOTHER all-powerful Jedi God, and every faction will make peace with each other to form the Ultra-Republic which will know no evil.

-Well the whole void of the Force plot is something new and interesting and the further you read in the NJO the more you realize how realistic it is and how very possible it could be. Alternate forms of this "void" occur in Hutts and Toydarians who we know are able to resist Jedi "mind tricks."
-Luke and Leia still kicking isn't far-fetched at all. They are in their mid to late forties and we all know that Jedi tend to age slower anyway. Mace Windu is close to one hundred in Attack of the Clones and he certainly is able to deal with threats. On top of this fact, the fact that Luke and Leia are getting older has been a major plot point and you can see that they can still do a lot, but there are some things that are rather difficult for them to do in their age.
-Ben Skywalker won't be an uber-Jedi in the end because he'll still be just a toddler by the time the NJO closes. As far as him being a Jedi "god" I think the entire essence of Star Wars makes that an acceptable standard. Star Wars is about the Skywalker family and the Skywalkers have always been the heroes. They always will be I imagine. :D
-The Ultra-Republic sounds good, but if you had stuck with the NJO a bit longer you will find that one of the biggest themes of the books deals with the fall of a galactic government. There will never be another Republic and that is readily clear in the recent books.


There are also some things I would like to see in upcoming novels, such as:Memorble, long lasting Pro and Antagonists (Other than Luke, Leia and evil Emporer clones).

-Protagonists (long lasting and memorable): Kyp Durron, Saba Sebatyne, Tahiri Veila, Lowbacca, Jaina Solo, and of course Jacen Solo.
-Antagonists (long lasting and memorable that have nothing to do with the Force or the Empire): Yuuzhan Vong, Nom Anor in particular.


They seem to be lacking something, because in the end we all now the bad guys will win and the good guys will lose.

I'm confused because if this is the case and the bad guys win and the good guys lose then we know that evil will not be defeated. So if this is the case then everyone won't live happily ever after. :D


I was even starting to like the series when it first started, but then they went and KILLED CHEWIE!! After that I stopped reading the books because I had always loved Chewbacca throughout the movies; I felt that the authors couldn't just go and kill him!

Heh, ever since Vector Prime hit the shelves and Chewie was killed, people complained and complained and complained. I understand, I liked Chewie too, but I also understand that if all the heroes live on, then it isn't Star Wars anymore, its a Marvel comics superhero story. :D
Take a look at the films and you see that the main characters and the heroes die as well.
-Qui Gon Jinn (Episode I)
-Mace Windu (Episode III)
-Padme Amidala (Episode III)
-Obi-Wan Kenobi (Episode IV)
-Yoda (Episode VI)
-Anakin Skywalker (Episode VI)*

*Anakin Skywalker dies and of all people you would think that the main character in all six films (the protagonist/antagonist) would survive, not die! But he does and that's an aspect that makes Star Wars so powerful and so loved. Because we know that even though it isn't real, the situations certainly can and are. War is awful and sometimes good people just die (such as Chewie). It isn't easy to accept, but its its not a choice we're given.

I find the NJO to be the most explosive series I have ever read. Besides the fact that its Star Wars, the storyline is incredible! I think that if you look at the NJO, you'll find all the aspects that made the films great. And if you gave up after Vector Prime, then you never really gave it a chance. ;)

That's just my opinion, but normally I find that it has a grain of truth in it.

Lucius
15 December 2002, 06:32 PM
"Time and again Luke, Han, Leia and the others had saved the galaxy, escaping unscathed. This time, though, would be different.

In a bold and controversial move, the first novel of the series, Vector Prime by R.A. Salvatore, clearly showed that this new enemy meant business. By tale's end, one of the classic heroes, Chewbacca the Wookiee, was a casualty of this new war."

I really think that's why such a beloved character was killed off. It made the war that much more real to the readers. That's also what I like about the NJO. There's no sure-fire way to beat the Vong. Just my thoughts.

Danan Valos
15 December 2002, 07:02 PM
I just wanted to inform everybody that in this post I had mis-typed something. When I had said that the bad guys win and the good guys lose, I had really intended to say the good guys always win and the bad guys always lose. I edited my post and I'm sorry for the confusion. Thanks, Nova Spice, for pointing this out. It was a grievous error on my part.

Otherwards, I understand that in a way they "had" to kill Chewie, for realism. I'm not complaining about his death, I just mourned for a while because he was such a great character.

ElfWord
15 December 2002, 07:25 PM
Best Series: The Thrawn series. I also like the NJO series, but until I have read it to the completetion, I don't know if I will like the whole thing.
Worst Series: I found the Black Fleet Crisis trilogy to be kind of tedious. It was still pretty good though.

Codym
15 December 2002, 08:15 PM
Thrawn Trilogy. Best. Nuff said. (Cloak of Deception comes in close second.)

Worst ... Though I'm no fan of the NJO (despise it actually,) it has had some high points, namely Vector Prime and Balance Point, and its not over yet, so the mess may be redeemed. My vote would go for either The Black Fleet Crisis or the Jedi Academy series. Both seemed to have no clue what Star Wars was about, and suffered from shallow writing and extra-ordinary bad plotting. Even in terms of tie-ins, these were truly lame.

EDIT: Oops! Forgot one truly dishonorable mention, the Young Jedi Knight series. May it find a place next to the Star Wars Holiday Special in annals of Star Wars folklore.

Frobi-Wan Kenobi
15 December 2002, 08:42 PM
Favorite - Star by Star with Destiny's Way a close second.

Worst - Splinter of the Mind's Eye - Luke and Leia makeout.

Ardent
15 December 2002, 08:57 PM
I've had a very hard time trying to figure out whether I dislike Darksaber or Planet of Twilight more. So I choose them both.

As far as the best: I, Jedi stands alone at the top for me. Michael A. Stackpole captured an incredible tale of personal growth and triumph from the person's own perspective and deserves every bit of praise he gets for it. Another nod to him for the X-Wing comic book series, far and away the best of the graphic novels (in particular: Blood and Honor).

An honorable mention for the writing on Dark Forces 2:Jedi Knight. It managed to make a very unbelieveable plot stomachable. I'm not talking about Dietz' novella adaption, by the way.

I'm in Nova's camp on the NJO, though. I think people attack and ridicule it because it shook up their comfortable trashy serialized novel-of-the-month environment and made Star Wars exciting again. Sure, I cried when Chewbacca died (he was my second favorite character from the trilogy), and I cried again when Anakin died (because there had been some stellar character construction around him during the prior novels), but I bought the books. And I read them. That justifies the overwriters at Del Rey. But I also loved them. That justifies my decision to support the NJO saga from the second I kept on reading after Sernpidal.

There is a reason these books have been critically-acclaimed. Not just because of the incredible line of talent Del Rey has run at us. Not because it's Star Wars. Because these books are fantastic. Anyone dismissing them out of hand for one (or two) things is, in my estimation, just being petty. It's like when your girlfriend pokes you in the ribs when you squirm around to wake up that dead limb (stupid pins and needles).

Bombaatu
15 December 2002, 10:56 PM
Best: Thrawn (of course) - a brilliant, charismatic villain and a "worthy" successor to the Emperor as a threat to the Republic.

Worst: NJO. I actually made it thru the first three books, and that was only by forcing myself. Not because they killed Chewie, but because the remainder of the characters seemed totally unbelievable and/or unlikable to me. Han crawls off into a bottle - ok, his best friend died, so it's understandable, but I would have thought him stronger than that. Jacen and Anakin arguing over the nature of the Force - sorry, but philosophy is not what teenage siblings argue over!
A large number of Luke's new Jedi - especially Kyp and his followers - seem headed straight for the darkside, if they aren't already there! They are arrogant, smug superior SOBs without a shred of respect for anyone or anything non-Jedi. Why would Luke train these people?!? Or at the very least, why didn't he ever put the smack-down on them for their attitude? Sorry, but after the 3rd book, I completely and totally lost interest and will never pick up anything else associated with it. (Rant mode off now...)

Paul Klein
15 December 2002, 11:50 PM
Favorite: The A.C. Crispen Han Solo Trilogy. Very well written, engrossing, and very little Imperial entanglements.

Worst: The Lando Calrissian Trilogy. One of (if not my favorite) characters written by an inept (at Star Wars at least) author.

Chris Curtis
16 December 2002, 07:44 AM
Okay, I'll go ahead and take the plunge here. As always, these are just personal opinions, blah blah blah...

Favorite: Hands down, my favorite SW series ever is the Brian Daley Han Solo Adventures trilogy. Not only was it one of the very first SW EU novels, but it just captures the universe and setting so well for me.

A close second would be the A.C. Crispen Han Solo Trilogy, for many of the same reasons that Paul Klein had.

Least Favorite: I've got to go with Frobi here: Splinter of the Mind's Eye really did reek. In fact, I can't recall any saving points for this novel...


I'll also take a moment to chime in on the whole NJO thing. First, let's make sure this doesn't slide down into a heated argument. The pro-, anti-NJO thing has been discussed in many other places.

Second, I started reading NJO quite late. In fact, just a couple of months ago. I had reservations going in simply from the basic plot points I'd heard, but I kept reading anyway. I'm nearly done with the 8th book right now. I'll admit that I barely got through the first book. Not only did I find it all quite unbelievable and contrived, but the writing itself just wasn't very good to me. However, I kept reading and the series has gotten better to me (either that, or I'm just getting used to it... <grin>).

But every time I think of the YV, I come back to what I thought the first time when I was reading Vector Prime. "I've seen this enemy before somewhere", I thought to myself. It took me a little while to figure out what my subconcious was trying to drag back up, but eventually I figured out who the YV remind me of:

Cobra-La from G.I.Joe, The Movie.

If any of the rest of you remember that, I think you may agree with me...

Jedi_Staailis
16 December 2002, 07:56 AM
Best: The Hand of Thrawn duology. Significant events, a strong and well explained plot, excellent characterization, and a flawless Star Wars atmosphere.

Worst: The Glove of Darth Vader series is undoubtedly the worst Star Wars ever written. If you're not familiar with the series, go read TheForce.Net's reviews here (http://www.theforce.net/books/reviews/br_young.shtml) (the series begins with The Glove of Darth Vader and ends with Prophets of the Dark Side). Sadly, I've read a few of these books, and can assure you that they're just as bad as the reviewer at TF.N suggests.

Sabre
16 December 2002, 11:21 AM
Of all the Star Wars books I liked I, Jedi the best.
And I liked Barbara Hambly's Children of the Jedi trilogy (I guess KJA deserves credit for darksaber) by far the least. At least NJO attempted something new and justifed some material I had written before it came out.

Seghast
16 December 2002, 11:50 AM
Favorite overall series? The X-Wing series (with the Thrawn Trilogy at second).

Favorite individual book? Shadows of the Empire (with Shadow Hunter at second).

Least favorite series? Black Fleet Crisis.

Least favorite individual book? Cloak of Deception. I just couldn't get in to it.

And now, my two cents on the NJO thing...

It's a great series, it's raising some interesting views on the Force, but there is one major thing I hate about the series...

Kyp.

I never have liked that guy. I keep hoping some Vong will go nuts, turn into a living blender, and frappe him.

Admiral_Atredies
16 December 2002, 02:41 PM
Well, alot of talk around here for just one day! It looks like alot of people to favor NJO. I'm not necessarily against the idea of such a series(in fact I'm all in favor for a continous, related series like the NJO), but rather the Vong. Just something about them that I don't like...but thats just my opinion, (for what its worth), and please don't start some debate on acount of my puny veiws.:)

Darklighter
16 December 2002, 10:42 PM
Well, I'm not a huge fan of the NJO, although I'm reading it. It's not the worst either.

Nope. My favourites are the Thrawn Trilogy and part of the X-wing series - specifically the books detailing Wraith squadron's exploits. It was a fun series! I didn't like Stackpole's books as much in that series, although I enjoyed I, Jedi a fair bit.

Master Dao Rin
16 December 2002, 11:39 PM
I'd have to say the original Heir to the Empire trilogy is the worst EU to date, since it started all this EU mess in the first place ...

Lets see:

ysalamiri (gee, thats really original).

Jade, knock-off of another comic character (yawn)

Noghri munckin's that can do everything and can't be touched (we've got that already with Jedi - we don't need ANOTHER Sun Crusher equivalent, do we? And people say KJA was the father of this idea ...)

A whiny Luke who hasn't seemed to gain any wisdom or knowledge ever since he whipped Vader tail, toppled the evil Galatic Empire and saved the galaxy --- hmmm, nope, never learned anything there could he? Nope, still whiny nobody, when along comes Super Goddess Mara Jade (or later incarnation Super-duper God Corran Horn), knows everything, and schools Luke in How The Force Works(tm).

Yep, that about covers it.

It was fine back when nobody knew about the Han Solo (First) Trilogy, and everyone could safely ignore the Calrission stuff.

<sigh>

The best? Hmmm ... I'm thats a tough one. I'd have to say stuff by Newcombe and some of the Adventure Journal stuff.

Krad-edis
17 December 2002, 12:21 AM
I absolutely love Micheal Stackpole's I, Jedi !

As for series or trilogy, I would have to say that Zahn's Heir to the Empire Trilogy rocked. It was really good, and I could actually see the book as a series of movies.

Both I recommend, and if you are in between reading something, check them out at your local library.


Earlier posted by ElfWord
I found the Black Fleet Crisis trilogy to be kind of tedious. It was still pretty good though.

Yep. My exact thoughts. Definitely a series which can be pretty boring. Good at parts I remember, but I cannot rememember what really happened off the top of my head. It took me a while to get through it, and as much as I am not a fan of the NJO series, the books certainly are fast paced and action packed, which the Black Fleet Crisis was not.

Emperor Xanderich II
17 December 2002, 04:13 AM
I really enjoyed the X-wing series and the Thrawn books.

Dark Saber ended up as toilet paper and the New Republic as kitchen towel.;)

Oh and, Moving to EU Discussion

Darien_Shadowfyre
17 December 2002, 09:09 AM
Hmmm man this is so difficult.
New Republic Era

Best Series. It a tie for me between the Thrawn Trilogy & the X-Wing Series. Zahn, Stackpole, and Allston really kept the NRE books alive with their work. I pretty much ignore everything else from that era.

Worst Series: The Callista Cycle. These three books make me want to forget I ever saw Star Wars. *guh* KJA is not as bad as everyone makes him out to be, but you really need to read his NON SW books to realize that. He is just not suited to this particular genre. Hambly's plots were just... *snore*

Its own Category: New Jedi Order. I am enjoying this series. Its dramatic, its better organized and better written. I must admit I didn't want to like this series and now I do. I only have two problems: Character Death By Editorial Decision (see Anakin), and the Complete BS that is Yuuzhan Vong tech. For the most part organic tech is cool, but ask anyone who knows ANYTHING about basic physics and mention some of their gravitic tech (ESPECIALLY the dovin basal shields) will tell you, "Hey if they can do THAT, they can just generate black holes INSIDE enemies and let them be destroyed without raising a hand." Their technology is completely overpowering if someone actually THOUGHT about what they just created in them. But thats easily overlooked.

Aside from that, I think the NJO books are the second best thing to happen to Star Wars. As for the comment about Ben becoming the next Uber Jedi, since this takes place in a 5 year period that is over halfway completed, he better eat some serious Wheaties if he wants to weigh in for the Final Bout. I mean sending a 3-4yo to face the Vong? Dont' you think we're treating them a little unfairly? :)

Darklighter
17 December 2002, 12:47 PM
Actually, as I re-read this thread, I'd like to agree with Paul Klein. The AC Crispin Han Solo trilogy was very good. I really enjoyed it.

The worst has to be the books in the Callista cycle, particularly Children of the Jedi. Ugh. Now that was a stinker.

Jared Zuuhl
17 December 2002, 06:56 PM
The best for me will be I Jedi. I really like the development of the character of Corran Horn. And coming vey closely Traitor. Although I am not very fond of the Yuuzhan Vong, the author did a nicely transition from an insecure Jacen to a more mature Jacen with a very strong beliefs and personality.

The worst in my opinion is Crystal Star.

Jim Williams
18 December 2002, 05:22 AM
I think my favorite was the Rogue/Wraith Squadron books. Talk about character development! And even though (admittedly) it seemed that they had to progressively deal with a bigger ship as the climax, it was done very well so the plot was more interesting than the battle.

I liked the individual story elements of the Black Fleet Crisis, but taken as a whole it was....too ambitious? My favorite part of that was seeing the Republic go to war with all the problems inherent in an overly diverse representative government.

Hmmm, I'd also have to jump on the AC Crispin Han Solo Trilogy as one of the best. She wrote some powerful scenes, especially in the 3rd book, that fully explain Han's personality in ANH.

I hated Crytal Star.

The New Rebellion is good to read simply for the final battle in space and when Luke SPOILER******







prepares to pull the ol' Obi-Wan Kenobi Force Spirit trick.

Zahn will always hold a place in my heart for jumpstarting the EU, but I can't believe how much "they" cater to his ego regarding his characters who, IMO, dominate his books. Some of you know my thoughts on Mara Jade, and the idea of her marrying Luke is....is....something I guess I should have seen coming.

As I read each successive book, and then got over the Agents of Eclipse segment of the NJO, I like it more and more. I'm very much interested in the resolution of the NJO and the state of the galaxy afterward.

Vreel Kudarin
6 January 2003, 12:18 PM
I've read nearly all the books, and quite a few of the graphic novels, and loved nearly all of them. The varied styles are part of the appeal for me. There hasn't been a single one that I've thought "oh, that is really 'un-Star Wars!' " which is why I was quite surprised by some opinions of the EU when I joined the Holonet.

I'd have to say that the X-Wing novels are my favourite series. This because they capture the severely overlooked area of 'ordinary' fighters in the war (ie. not Jedi or top-level officers/heroes). The X-Wing series has humour, lovable and very deep characters, and deaths of the characters you grow to like, which can really hit you hard (well me anyway). They also have excellently described combat, particulary in space dogfights and small fleet engagements, something few other EU sources have. The battles are not neccessarily critical to the war, but no less exciting. Ever since I saw A New Hope for the first time, I've wanted to be an Alliance fighter pilot. :)

I have to say it, I love the NJO series. Most of the reasons for this have already been mentioned, namely that it has brought something new to that galaxy far far away, in the form of more tangible danger, new challenges, excellent and original 'bad guys', lots of Jedi action, nice little links to the prequels. Most of all they challenge the nature of the Force (very relevant with the lamented midichlorian revalation), and in my opinion, will actually make the Force a stronger concept at the end; due to the conclusion on how the Vong fit in that the novels appear to be steering towards...

My other favourites would be the classic Thrawn Trilogy, the (new) Han Solo Trilogy, and I, Jedi, all of which have great characterisation, pathos and atmosphere.

I'm not sure if I have any particular dislikes. I'd probably go for Darksaber (although the punchline that the superweapon didn't actually work was very good!), or maybe Crystal Star. This is because I don't think they were written as masterfully as they could have been.

Oh, the one annoying thing about EU novels that always gets me is when authors don't know the difference between a turbolaser and a laser cannon. :raised:

Rogue Janson
6 January 2003, 12:48 PM
I'm up to Dark Journey in the NJO series now, and they're all pretty good. The big advantage with NJO is having a cohesive series of books, rather than all the little threats that kept popping up through all the NR books. Still I can't fully get into them, I still get the feeling that it's just one threat too many for the galaxy - it's just come out of the most evil and encompassing empire it's known and what happen it gets overrun by a load of alien invaders within the next couple of decades. Talk about bad luck.

Favourite books
I think the top has to be the AC Crispin Han Solo trilogy. They had a point, they had character and they were well written. And they even left gaps for Han and Lando while they went off on their adventures detailed in the original trilogies. Only downside is the lack of any force/jedi stuff. I think the trilogy just pips the X-Wing series by being more serious.
The X-Wing books were all great, it was good to have a series that didn't just follow the main characters around and filled in some of the background of the conflict between the New Republic and Empire without having to invent some new gimmick.

I think I have some of Jim's sentiments regarding the Zahn books

I can't believe how much "they" cater to his ego regarding his characters who, IMO, dominate his books
In particular I never really got into Grand Admiral Thrawn, he never really seemed developed to me - like Zahn wanted an evil genius for the villain, just didn't want him evil or villainous, so just glossed over these. Also for me it got to the point where if Luke's landspeeder would break down, I was expecting it to be some elaborate plot of Thrawn's to hinder the new republic. Having said that, all his books are still good.
"I have studied their art and they seem to be afraid of pointy shapes. Thus I will attack using out star destroyers."
"Brilliant Grand Admiral!"

Both the Black Fleet Crisis and the Corellian trilogy dragged a bit, they just don't seem to excite me as much as the other books.

Crystal Star was probably my least favourite book. It was just all round poor. Darksaber comes second, especially for the superweapon not working.

I actually didn't mind the Callista books that were written by Barbara Hambly. Even Children of the Jedi, which most people seem to dislike strongly, I enjoyed quite a bit.

Terras Jadeonar & Raven
6 January 2003, 02:05 PM
I've got all the books in the EU sw line, except for the Young Jedi Knights serries (thought it was a childrens serries)...

I thought all of them were alright... Zahns Thrawn Trilogy is an all time favorite for starting the serries and with new interesting characters like Karde, Mara, Thrawn.... Han Solo trilogy was also great, reading about Han's childhood to young adult. X-Wing serries was awesome.

Shadows of the Empire was good change of pace, being Han solo out of the picture and a new YT serries craft filling in the gap (reports of Dash Rendar surviving or not is still highly debatable - a very good thing).

Courtship of Princess Leia was also good for the moral delima it presented... A very classic delima presented into the sw genre. Choice between good ol' Han (for herself) or the Hapan Prince which would give the New Republic strong Hapan backing - with strong political ties for both groups. (certainly no outside pressure on Leia from the NR huh? ;) ). It was fun see'ing Han sweat and then butter up and charm Leia for all it was worth. This book also presented future outcomes & reprecussions for the later books in the sw universe - Tenal 'Ka, Prince Isolder's delima with the Hapan Queen mother in the YJK & NJO serries...

As for Darksaber, Children of the Jedi, Planet of Twilight... Those were not bad... yeah, less memorable than others, but still brought me through countless hours of boredom while at various apointments and other waiting periods. And it did feature some interesting perils of Liea having her children and the whole perspective of them in the spotlight and the outside threats. Luke's own journeys were interesting to read, Eye of Palpatine comes to mind.

New Rebelion - interesting... Nothing is ever peaceful for the NR during supposedly times of peace...

Jedi Academy - an upstart idea of rebuilding the jedi Academy. I liked it. It had introduced alot of new characters, and the newness of it did present its own dangers regarding the darkside and sith - Exar Kun... They didnt have much experiance save a couple holocrons, they were in essence charting new territory. After all, if anything it did establish the mark of jedi becoming into the sw again. It also offspring the Young Jedi Knight serries of books...

I, Jedi... excellent book focused on Corran Horn. one of my favs. Great character development from his leaving the xwing squadron and taking his own journey to rediscover himself and his past, learning more about his family heritage and revelations of jedi, and the force capabilities within him.

Zhan duology: Spectre of the Past, Visions of the Future: an interesting set. Certainly breaks the "trilogy" theme in the sw trend of books.The two books were excellent reads... But I feel the "Duo"-ology was a big cop-out though. The 2 books did center primarily around Luke & Mara, at the end of the second book, they proposed to each other.
Now for the cop-out: where was their marriage ceremony events??? no seperate book, should've been included as a third book making it a trilogy... Instead, we all had to buy the comic book of it... few measly pages of graphic illustrations for half the price of a good hardcover! As much as I wanted to read the comics, I didn't bother... I'm not into comics.

I dont mind when the comic adaptations come after the noveliztions, but not when they replace a novelization...

NJO Serries: I despised the serries at first, knowing it was the marking the end of the current sw books as I knew it, the NR storyline and its versatility of books it represented lik mentioned above is gone. Now just a single story arc, limited set amount of books to tell it with. Aside from the Few Prequel books. Also It wasn't soo much the Vong as a invading race with their anti-tech beliefs and organic tech... It was the high body count and death of key characters that ranked me. Its also how they weakened mara with a new mysterious disease that kept threatining to nix her - so much for reading about their wonderful post marraige life. Looking at the serries at current status, they've taken out half the galaxy, gotten right to the core. If that aint marking the end of a Genre I don't know what is..

However, i'm still reading the serries. it's still starwars. despite great losses (chewie, anakin) and big miracles (ben), and rediculus prophesies (one great jedi will be the savior) in the books, it does have me hooked to see it through to the end...


Prequels:
Rogue Planet. I thought it was dull... save for anakin getting into trouble with the hang-glider races in coruscant's waste processing area... I thought the book was rather dry and flavorless for plot and story. The section with the little lifeforms and the attuning with them to form a symbiotic relationship to an uber unbelivable half-organic ship... totally threw my suspense of belief out the window.. howver it did have the brief hints of Vegere, and her disapearance for reasons unkown. I think the whole book was just for the inclusion of Vegere and the foreshadow of the Vong, and for that, the book really suffered...

The Aproaching Storm: well written, good as the sw epII movie. a good develoment of character for obi-wan and anakin. an enjoyable read about their journey to a planet which could have dire consequences.

BenWilbur
5 February 2003, 08:03 AM
I don't like the NJO series - the plot irks the daylights out of me.

Favorites - Calrissian books and the original Solo series. I wish there was a sourcebook for the Calrissian series, that would be great.

To me some of the books became stale. I would like see more things like Tales from Jabba's Palace and Tale's from the Cantina... We are missing it for the new books... How about tales from the Sports Bar, or Tales from Dex's Diner, or Tales from the Racers Pit, those would be great. Tales from Genosia (Individual stories of the Jedi preceeding their arrival on Genosis) those would be great. I wish someone would bring Boshek back... Yirka Mig... and Yes I remeber the Cobra La... It makes sense....

I do not use the NJO timeline. It is all EU and since it did not come from Georges mouth then it is optional. Our opinion holds as much weight as the author

coldskier0320
5 February 2003, 10:41 AM
Best, either AC Crispin's Han Solo trilogy or the Han Solo adventures, b/c han is such a cool character and the stories were wll written and exciting without being unbelievably so. Also, the thrawn trilogy is a close runner-up, for once the NR got something thrown at it that had the actual potential to bring it down (although i thought things fell together a little TOO neatly in the last command)

Worst: Splinter of the Minds Eye WAS pretty bad, although you cant really hold the luke/leia thing against the author (cant think of his name right now) because , i think, the book was written between the times that ANH and TESB came out. However, it was poorly written compared to others. Another baddie was the crystal star, i just thought that it was a little too out there and it wasnt very well written either

and as far as the NJO books: i dont have a true, unbiased opinion that i would give b/c i only know what ive gathered from friends and other sources, but from what i hear, it doesnt sound very appealing to me, oh well...

Jim Williams
5 February 2003, 12:22 PM
I've already said my piece, but I missed this the first time through...

"I have studied their art and they seem to be afraid of pointy shapes. Thus I will attack using out star destroyers."

"Brilliant Grand Admiral!"

Very funny Rogue Janson. B)

Wesly Senesca
12 February 2003, 12:00 PM
Best: Thrawn Trilogy
The best EU material I've ever read, hands down.
(Luke was not a whiny idiot anymore)

Worst: Splinter of the Mind's Eye
Incest is a nasty thing to mess around with, especially when it
borders on becoming Oedipus Rex (a bad thing to happen to
anybody

The NJO question
Let it be.
If you were the author, you choose who dies and who doesn't.
The whole idea of killing off main characters is to demonstrate that
the Yuuzhan Vong are deadly. Who knows who's next? (probably
the authors)

Nova Spice
12 February 2003, 01:30 PM
I don't like the NJO series - the plot irks the daylights out of me.

What about the plot irks you? Just curious?


and as far as the NJO books: i dont have a true, unbiased opinion that i would give b/c i only know what ive gathered from friends and other sources, but from what i hear, it doesnt sound very appealing to me, oh well...

You might be surprised.....I think that if you give it a try you just might find that the series well deserves the awards it's won. I will point out that all fifteen novels have been New York Times Bestsellers. ;)

Ardent
13 February 2003, 07:08 PM
Originally posted by Nova Spice
You might be surprised.....I think that if you give it a try you just might find that the series well deserves the awards it's won. I will point out that all fifteen novels have been New York Times Bestsellers. ;)

Just a little dissention here...it's hard to find a Star Wars novel that WASN'T a New York Times Bestseller. Sometimes the "NYTimes Bestseller!" editions were printed with the initial run and sent out only a week later. :/ Go figure.

Wedge in Red2
28 February 2003, 05:20 AM
Well, I just had to have my 2cr worth here. Once again, this is all opinion, so don't bite my head off.

Favourite:
Thrawn Trilogy. I liked the feel of it. It introduced a bunch of new elements, while still keeping very much a SW feel to it - the new planets were cool. Closely followed by the X-Wing stuff, because one thing I love with Star Wars is the entire space element, and X-Wing gave readers a chance to explore that element more.

Least Favourite: NJO, closely followed by Black Fleet Crisis. Closely followed by Jedi Academy. Closely followed by Darksaber...

I've come to the conclusion I don't like the EU much, which really is a shame. Let me try to explain why.

My view of Star Wars is this. Good vs Evil, with the main characters (Anakin, Luke) needing to make that choice. Hard science is bypassed for anything that makes the story work. While aliens exist, Humans are still the driving force in the Universe (most the Rebellion and Empire were human dominated).

So, I don't like NJO because: 1) it changes the theme from Good v Evil to Force v Anti-Force; and 2) It moved humans away from being the driving force on both sides (the enemy is now not human). I think NJO was a total change in direction in SW. I notice Nova Spice mentioned early on in the discussion that he loved NJO because it was something new. I think that is my base problem with it - it's something new, not the classic Star Wars I love.

Black Fleet Crisis - Didn't like the writing style, and got the feeling the author didn't understand what made Star Wars what it is. It just struck me as "once again, the New Republic faces another uber-threat that up until now has remained hidden". I'll give the NJO that - at least it has an overarching enemy and storyline, rather than introducing a new enemy each time.
For more of my rant on the Black Fleet crisis, check out this thread (http://holonet.swrpgnetwork.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=9323).

Jedi Academy - KJA takes the original SW trilogy and tries to one-up it. You had a space station that could destroy planets? I've got a starfighter that can destroy entire systems and is indestructable. Kyp does the entire Vader thing - lured to the dark side, redeems himself at the end. While I liked some of the ideas, a lot of it irked me.

I think, at the end of the day, Star Wars is a cycle and the movies stand up well as having a definitive beginning and end. The EU tried to take what was really a finished story and carry it on. I think the EU has done it's dash, and is really polluting the universe we love in an attempt to make a few more bucks off readers.

Controversial? Perhaps, but it's the conclusion I've come to. Don't shoot me :)

Jon

Ardent
28 February 2003, 08:10 AM
Eh, the NJO seems very much a good vs. evil conflict. The authors are being careful to point out that not everyone should be shuffled into their side's stereotype however.

As far as it not being Humans vs Humans, that's also unconfirmed. Insofar as I'm willing to speculate, Yuuzhan Vong, prior to their ritual scarrings and cultural indoctrinations, would be very similar to baseline humans. This is a point the authors have been trying, fairly unsuccessfully, to get across. The major epiphany for me was the re-education of Tahiri as Riina Kwaad. To Anakin, she LOOKED like a Yuuzhan Vong.

It follows the underlying arc from 13th Warrior with the bearzark warriors...something in humanity's base animalism that's drawn out through alteration of appearance. This almost certainly leads to conflict, even if it does pit brother against brother.

Just my thoughts on the issue...

Tramp
1 March 2003, 03:40 PM
Originally posted by Terras Jadeonar &amp; Raven
I've got all the books in the EU sw line, except for the Young Jedi Knights serries (thought it was a childrens serries)...


Zhan duology: Spectre of the Past, Visions of the Future: an interesting set. Certainly breaks the "trilogy" theme in the sw trend of books.The two books were excellent reads... But I feel the "Duo"-ology was a big cop-out though. The 2 books did center primarily around Luke & Mara, at the end of the second book, they proposed to each other.
Now for the cop-out: where was their marriage ceremony events??? no seperate book, should've been included as a third book making it a trilogy... Instead, we all had to buy the comic book of it... few measly pages of graphic illustrations for half the price of a good hardcover! As much as I wanted to read the comics, I didn't bother... I'm not into comics.

I dont mind when the comic adaptations come after the noveliztions, but not when they replace a novelization...


First off, I'd pick up those YJK books, they're excellent, and were meant for young adults (i.e. 12-18). I'm over 30 and enjoyed them immensly.

Now, on to SW Union. Even if you're not "into comics", I'd still pick this up. The story is incredible and the artwork is some of the best out there. The character likenesses are especially well done. it is not as you put it a "few measly pages of graphic illustrations", it was, IMO, the best choice of media for the wedding (an event, I'd like to point out would not be able to fill a full novel in and of itself) because we are able to actually see the wedding and all of its finery. we know what Mara's gown looks like as well as what the brides maids, and the groom and his men wore, we can actually see it . In essence we're looking at their wedding album, not just reading about it. I'd check it out if I were you, even if you don't buy it in the end. Give it a chance, you might be surprized.:kenobi:

mojo1701
1 March 2003, 06:00 PM
Originally posted by Nova Spice:

-Anakin Skywalker (Episode VI)*

*Anakin Skywalker dies and of all people you would think that the main character in all six films (the protagonist/antagonist) would survive, not die! But he does and that's an aspect that makes Star Wars so powerful and so loved. Because we know that even though it isn't real, the situations certainly can and are. War is awful and sometimes good people just die (such as Chewie). It isn't easy to accept, but its its not a choice we're given.


I have recently been learning in English class about literary archetypes, and we have learned that Star Wars is chock full of these. For example, Anakin is under the "hero" archetype:

1. Born of a virgin
2. Circumstances of his birth unclear
3. Is given up to foster parents (I guess it was Obi-Wan)
4. There was an attempt on his life early on
5. Ruled uneventfully (or, in his case, Jedi)
6. Went through a period of shame (Darth Vader)
7. Died on a hill outside of town (Death Star II)
8. Body was not buried

Wow, I am so gonna pass that English test!

And other ones were: Mentor/Apprentice (Anakin/Luke with Obi-Wan), Desert - Tatooine (desert is a bad, evil place)

that's all I can remember.

Wedge in Red2
3 March 2003, 02:34 AM
Originally posted by Ardent
Eh, the NJO seems very much a good vs. evil conflict. The authors are being careful to point out that not everyone should be shuffled into their side's stereotype however.

I didn't see it that way. The Vong are a different species with a different cultural identity. Following what their culture defines as correct is not evil in their view. However, to the humans and the rest of the galaxy, it is viewed as evil. It is a battle over viewpoints, not good versus evil, IMO. In the classic trilogy, Tarkin/Vader/The Emperor were willfully commiting evil acts. In NJO, the Vong are commiting acts they don't view as being evil. I consider that as the underlying difference.



As far as it not being Humans vs Humans, that's also unconfirmed. Insofar as I'm willing to speculate, Yuuzhan Vong, prior to their ritual scarrings and cultural indoctrinations, would be very similar to baseline humans. This is a point the authors have been trying, fairly unsuccessfully, to get across. The major epiphany for me was the re-education of Tahiri as Riina Kwaad. To Anakin, she LOOKED like a Yuuzhan Vong.


Ah. I didn't really get that far.


It follows the underlying arc from 13th Warrior with the bearzark warriors...

Haven't seen 13th warrior either. :(

Jim Williams
3 March 2003, 04:45 AM
I'm not sure its fair to say that a cultural practice does not make a species/society evil. The Nazis did not identify their ideology as evil, and they murdered on an unprecedented scale. The Vong murder on an unprecedented scale. Heck, these guys make Tarkin look like a piker.

I don't even think Vader would have identified himself as evil. He simply wanted to "bring order to the galaxy and end this destructive conflict. Before I would have taken that as persuasion, but Anikin's conversation with Padme during the picnic really opened my eyes as to what some Imperials were trying to accomplish.

Jedi Cahlwyn
3 March 2003, 05:37 AM
For me, I have a lot of favorites. I really like almost all of the EU. Ann Crispin's Han Solo trilogy, all of the X-wing/Wraith Squadron novels, the New Jedi Order, Young Jedi Knights, Jedi Apprentice (yeah, the young adult books rock!). I am even a Kevin J. Anderson supporter and like his stories.

Really, the only one I didn't like was the Children of the Jedi by Barbara Hambly. It took me over a month to read it (and i usually read a book a week or more). In the end I even liked the story (for the most part) and I liked Darksaber and Planet of Twilight (minus the boring stuff... the plot was neat).

The problem I had was that her writing is horrid. I looked in that book and my girlfriend had a few of Hambly's fantasy novels and the writing is the same. One sentence that goes on for like two paragraphs. No structure or clear division. It just kept going on, and on, and on. I couldn't get past that for a long time.

All that said, I can't think of ONE book that I haven't thoroughly enjoyed in the end. Well except the one I'm reading now... it is SOOOO boring. The Approaching Storm. I hope it gets better (I'm a little over half way) and it is just so slow. Wandering through the plains on a planet. They travel. Rest. Get attacked by wildlife. Chastise Anakin. Feel bad for Anakin. Repeat.

Jim Williams
3 March 2003, 05:46 AM
My wife says it gets better in the end, but your preliminary analysis is so much like her's it's not funny. No wonder he turned to the dark side.

Wedge in Red2
3 March 2003, 07:28 AM
Originally posted by Jim Williams
I'm not sure its fair to say that a cultural practice does not make a species/society evil. The Nazis did not identify their ideology as evil, and they murdered on an unprecedented scale. The Vong murder on an unprecedented scale. Heck, these guys make Tarkin look like a piker.

Okay, good point.

Lets take another perspective, though. A male Lion attempts to kill any males in a females litter. Do you define Lions as an evil creature? I know, it's not really on the same level as we're talking about, Lions do not have a level of intelligence (and perhaps therefore do not have a responsibility for their actions - although that's getting way to philosophical for me).

What I guess I'm saying is the Vong are a different species, is it right to hold them to our same standard of evil?

Another major difference between the Vong and the Empire - the Empire was a known enemy, it was well established, and with a few exceptions the limits of what it could do were known. The Vong are largely unknown - not much is known about their technology, their traditions and motivations.

In conculsion, the Rebellion v the Empire is a totally different type of conflict than the Republic v the Vong. And I don't like it.

Anyway, I think we're getting a bit side-tracked from the point of this thread. I've said what novels I did and didn't like, and any amount of debate on the topic is not going to change that opinion.

Jon

Ardent
3 March 2003, 09:13 AM
Originally posted by Wedge in Red2
Lets take another perspective, though. A male Lion attempts to kill any males in a females litter. Do you define Lions as an evil creature? I know, it's not really on the same level as we're talking about, Lions do not have a level of intelligence (and perhaps therefore do not have a responsibility for their actions - although that's getting way to philosophical for me).

You're pretty much correct that it's not a great analogy. The lion didn't reason out that he should kill the males. His instincts told him so. Big difference.


What I guess I'm saying is the Vong are a different species, is it right to hold them to our same standard of evil?

Muslims are a different ethnic/religious group, is it right to hold them to our same standard of evil? I happen to think so. Most religions probably agree. Not being something should not exclude you from standards, although you should not put yourself in a position to judge whether or not those standards are being breached.


Another major difference between the Vong and the Empire - the Empire was a known enemy, it was well established, and with a few exceptions the limits of what it could do were known. The Vong are largely unknown - not much is known about their technology, their traditions and motivations.

Nothing ever said an unknown quantity can't be evil. In fact, all fantasy novels with BBEGs seem to pivot on this point. Heck, uranium is evil.


In conculsion, the Rebellion v the Empire is a totally different type of conflict than the Republic v the Vong. And I don't like it.

I just see it as the logical evolution of warfare in the Star Wars universe. Much like the real world from Korea to Desert Storm. New threat, new soldiers, new tactics, new conflict.


Anyway, I think we're getting a bit side-tracked from the point of this thread. I've said what novels I did and didn't like, and any amount of debate on the topic is not going to change that opinion.

Then consider this for the sake of people reading this thread who are still indecisive about reading the NJO saga. They should, by all means, read it because it disappoints very little.

Wedge in Red2
3 March 2003, 09:35 AM
Originally posted by Ardent

Nothing ever said an unknown quantity can't be evil. In fact, all fantasy novels with BBEGs seem to pivot on this point. Heck, uranium is evil.

My bad. I meant to say I was raising another reason I didn't like the NJO. I had moved away from the "isn't good v evil" argument and was raising a new point - that I didn't like the unknown element of the Vong. I think I prety much lost the "not good v evil" argument (in fact, in hindsight I think I had lost it from the outset).

Let me try and clear up what I was trying to say. I believe that societie's/cultures have a right to determine their own beliefs and act in accordance with them. However, as soon as they try to enforce their beliefs on others, they step over the line. The Vong's self mutilation is fine, their repulsion with machines is fine, right up to the point where they try to enforce their view upon others. At that point, it's wrong (and evil, at least in the manner they go about it).

Also, my initial argument was that the NJO is more Force v Anti-Force. I'm not saying there's not an element of good v evil in there, just that the overall nature of the conflict seemed to be more about Force v Anti-Force, or Jedi v Vong. Up to the point where I stopped reading the NJO, the main defenders of the Republic were the Jedi. Of course, I hear later on the New Republic military took a greater role, but at the beginning it seemed very much to be the Force defenders against the Anti-Force invaders.

Hope that clears it up a bit.


I just see it as the logical evolution of warfare in the Star Wars universe. Much like the real world from Korea to Desert Storm. New threat, new soldiers, new tactics, new conflict.

Okay, but just because someone "liked" the Korea conflict doesn't mean they have to like the way Desert Storm played out, to use your analogy.

The NJO, in my opinion, is a complete change in direction in the SW universe. It's like it took a 90 degree turn. And I for one did not like that change.

Perhaps people don't like the "logical evolution". Star Wars is a fairy tale in space, and I for one don't think there is a need to logically evolve it.


Then consider this for the sake of people reading this thread who are still indecisive about reading the NJO saga. They should, by all means, read it because it disappoints very little.

I think you missed the "IMO" at the end of that last sentence. So far, there have been 4 posters who have rated NJO as their least favourite as compared to 2 who rated it their favourite (although a lot of posters did give it honourable mention - I didn't count them). Just because you like it doesn't mean everyone else has to like it.

Jon

Nova Spice
3 March 2003, 08:11 PM
Perhaps people don't like the "logical evolution". Star Wars is a fairy tale in space, and I for one don't think there is a need to logically evolve it.

As with all things, if Star Wars doesn't evolve, it dies. Plain and simple. The New Jedi Order is chock full of things from the original trilogy, the EU (good and bad), and life itself. I'm curious as to how far you've made it into the series?

Again, I've stated my reasons for loving the series in earlier posts in this thread, but I often wonder if ninety percent of the NJO critics are people who stopped after Vector Prime? :raised:

Wedge in Red2
4 March 2003, 12:42 AM
Originally posted by Nova Spice

As with all things, if Star Wars doesn't evolve, it dies. Plain and simple.

Death is a natural part of life, and all things die eventually. And just because the EU stops, doesn't mean that we don't still take joy from the original (or existing) works. Death is not necessarily a bad thing in this case, IMO. Remember, in my original post I said I'd come to the conclusion that I didn't like the EU (despite the fact I really wanted to like it).


I'm curious as to how far you've made it into the series?

Past Vector Prime :), although not by much - I read the first 3 books in the series (up to the end of Dark Tide II). I must admit the vigour and emotion with which people are arguing in favour of the series is making me wonder if perhaps I should give it another chance.

Jon

Codym
4 March 2003, 02:46 AM
Originally posted by Wedge in Red2


Past Vector Prime :), although not by much - I read the first 3 books in the series (up to the end of Dark Tide II). I must admit the vigour and emotion with which people are arguing in favour of the series is making me wonder if perhaps I should give it another chance.

Jon

Depends what your problems are with the series. Personally, I've given up the ghost of the series being savible, but mostly because the gernerally poor plotting of the series, the overpowered, under developed Vong hold no interest. It may be something completely different for you.

Ardent
4 March 2003, 09:48 AM
Originally posted by Codym
Depends what your problems are with the series. Personally, I've given up the ghost of the series being savible, but mostly because the gernerally poor plotting of the series, the overpowered, under developed Vong hold no interest. It may be something completely different for you.

One of the points that's disappointed me is that even with entire plotlines focusing around Yuuzhan Vong characters, very little about their culture is actually revealed to us. Dunno why that is. May be Del Rey, may be a complete lack of background information to draw from, may just be the authors failing to find a way to work in that sort of information.

However, it's inconsequential to the overall effect. The Yuuzhan Vong in general are not supposed to be a quantifiable species. That was the problem with the Empire...it became so quantifiable that you rarely needed to read the books to figure out what was going to happen.

One of the other issues I had was that the Chewie card was played too soon. He should have died further along in the series and something less controversial should have been used as a hook. Just MHO though. No offense to R.A. Salvatore, either, whom I have the utmost respect for as a writer. Just an ill-played hand insofar as I can see.

coldskier0320
4 March 2003, 11:01 AM
Once again, dont bite my head off cause, when it comes down to it, i dont really know what im talking about (i havent read NJO at all) the big gripes i have with the way these guys have taken the SW universe are the following: Luke and Mara getting married just kinda leaves a bad taste in my mouth, i cant really see Luke marrying anyone, much less Mara Jade, who i thought was super cool, thought, also bad was the chewie thing but i can let that one go, i also was kinda bummed out that the authors had a whole galaxy to work with and they still resorted to the old sci-fi threat: aliens from outer space. Oh, well...

BTW other GREAT EU I forgot to mention are the OLD Han Solo Trilogy. I think Brian Daley (sp?) really captured the feel of the SW universe and wrote a few really interesting stories in the process. They have their fair share of action, but not too much, and they made threats out of seemingly insignificant forces (animal herd, miners, etc.)

Figureman2
5 September 2003, 03:30 PM
Contrary to popular opinion, Kevin J. Anderson is actually one of my favorite Star Wars authors. I believe no one writes fast-paced action quite like him, and that's one of my favorite parts of Star Wars. His plots, while a bit overused in the superweapon department, always put new spins on things, incorporating an Imperial enemy with some kind of third party. The characters he introduced are pretty good as well, particularly the Jedi trainees.
So that aside:

Favorite: I've pretty much got a tie here between The Krytos Trap and Darksaber. The Krytos Trap had some pretty amazing courtroom scenes in addition to some fun snubfights and a pretty cool prison escape for Corran. It also opened up a plot point that would be crucial in all of Stackpole's future books. Darksaber, on the other hand, had a lot of action and some very interesting characterization. Daala and Pellaeon joining forces was one of the coolest moves made in EU yet.

Least favorite: Although I liked Children of the Jedi fairly well, Planet of Twilight really didn't do anything for me. I happen to like Callista's character a lot, and they really could've done really interesting things with her if she had stuck around and had a bigger part in this book. However, Planet of Twilight has barely any action, a completely superfluous Han/Chewie/Lando plot, and ultimately no resolution for either Callista or Admiral Daala, both of whom had great potential. The end really bugged me in that absolutely nothing gets done between Luke and Callista... the whole story kind of seemed in vain, not to mention unrealistic. I did, however, like Leia's fight against Beldorion.

So really, I've liked all the books, but Truce at Bakura and Planet of Twilight were really nothing special. My favorite authors are most definitely Michael Stackpole and Kevin J. Anderson.

Darth Fierce
6 September 2003, 11:57 AM
Of all the SW novelizations I've read, I'd have to give the title of the best series to the Heir to the Empire (Thrawn) trilogy. I've read those three books so many times that they're falling apart. I also enjoy the NJO series, as I've always believed that the best SW novels are the ones in which you truly believe that the good guys could lose (not that they necessarily will).

The worst SW novel I've read was definitely Darksaber (which I hate saying because I like the Hutts). That novel almost struck me as comedic relief. I also never really cared for the Champions of the Force series. Just my two cents.

Darth Fierce :vader:

BrianDavion
6 September 2003, 12:49 PM
Luke and Mara getting married just kinda leaves a bad taste in my mouth, i cant really see Luke marrying anyone, much less Mara Jade

I can. I saw Mara and Luke getting together in the end as early as Heir to the Empire