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Rogue Janson
24 April 2004, 01:18 PM
Ok, this has been annoying me more and more for a while now.

How many more times do I have to see someone misuse an apostrophe?
:mad:
In particular, people using apostrophes for plurals.

Now I know this is the internet, people are lazy with their typing, some people are young, and I am quite particular about spelling and grammar. Most of the time it doesn't really bother me. But this is a basic mistake, something you should learn when you're in primary school (or whatever the equivalent is where you are).

It's very simple. Apostrophes are for possessives and abbreviations.
So, for example - The sister of Luke = Luke's sister.
Leia is my sister - Leia's my sister.

Not for plurals.
"I see more than one bantha down there" is not "I see two Bantha's down there."
This means that you see two "down there" owned by a bantha.

This is what annoys me most, more than forgetting apostrophes. Because a child that's learning to write doesn't write "there are lots of cat's." To do that, you have to learn about apostrophes and then get it wrong. And it's not even laziness (which I can understand), because you're adding in an extra character.

A related annoyance is getting words like there, they're and their mixed up. I know they sound the same, but it's not hard to know the difference.
There - an expression of position. "Two banthas down there." Or a preposition(?) as in "there are to many of them."
Their - possessive. "Their shields are too strong!" ("the shields of them are too strong")
They're - short for they are. "They're on Dantooine"

And so on for various other words, like who's and whose (though to be fair that one's a little trickier, though it does conform to the apostrophe rules listed above).
Just think about the words you're typing from time to time.

:rolleyes: rant over for now.

Bjorn
24 April 2004, 02:05 PM
Wow. If that upsets you, you must go nuts reading posts on various internet forums. :rolleyes:

When reading, why not just pay attention to what the posters are trying to get across instead of how they spell it.

But to each his own I guess.



Bjorn

Rogue Janson
24 April 2004, 02:46 PM
Well most of the time I'm ok, I'm not really an easily annoyed person. It helps that I spend most of my forum time here and on exeter university forums and both have a comparatively high standard.

But I do notice mistakes. This apostrophe thing which for some reason annoys me so much seems to have got worse recently for some reason, which is what's made me finally get annoyed enough to rant about it.

From time to time you do see a post where the spelling and grammar are so bad that you can't figure out what the poster is trying to say.

Heaven help these people if they ever need to do something important involving writing.

Ronin
24 April 2004, 05:58 PM
I'm also a member of cosplay.com...and the spelling and grammar on there is (expletive deleted) awful!
Far worse than here.
I do fully understand your point Rogue Janson, some of my lower-level Japanese students don't make such mistakes...
(but I know I do, particularly when I'm sleepy ;) )

Here's a toughie then...

" : " versus " ; " :D

Reverend Strone
24 April 2004, 06:52 PM
My biggest typing issue with the internet is the American vs English spelling. Being in NZ, we spell according to the English tradition, which means using a lot more "u"s in words like honour, armour, colour etc, while Americans drop "z"s wherever we would often us an "s" such as in words like sympathise, theorise, disguise etc.

Over the past couple of years, as a result of the amount of time I spend online and the number of Americans I e-mail daily for work and play, my spelling has become a bizarrely degenerated mix and match of both spelling regimes. It's further exacerbated by the fact that the spell checker on my work computer is American, while my home machine has an English one.

Consequently, my spelling (which was once my strong suit) looks dreadful no matter who I'm writing too now! ;)

Kordeth
24 April 2004, 07:35 PM
Bad spelling I can excuse, unless it's really atrocious, but I agree that bad grammar is a serious annoyance. And just to be pedantic, Rogue, you made two mistakes yourself:


Or a preposition(?) as in "there are to many of them."

In this case, "there" is a pronoun (at least according to Mirriam-Webster), and it should be "there are too many of them." :D

This has been your helpful grammar pedantry for the day. ;)

Talonne Hauk
24 April 2004, 08:42 PM
As a former English major, I thank you for venting your spleen for me.:D

wolverine
24 April 2004, 11:10 PM
Naa. WE have not vented yet!!

While i can see RJ's point, there are people who IMO deliberatly do that, to see how many people they can 'rile'...

Rogue Janson
25 April 2004, 02:03 AM
originally posted by Ronin
" : " versus " ; "
Well the difference is fairly easy, though semi-colon use is a bit trickier. A semi-colon is used for lists, typically those where the items are longer than just a few words, or a bit like a short full stop, to separate what could be two sentences.

So a semi-colon can be used as follows: (colon)
The imperial navy consists of numerous different classes of vessel: the Imperial Star Destroyer is the mainstay of the fleet; the Nebulon-B frigate is used for escort duties; the Carrack Cruiser is a light picket ship; and the Lancer Frigate is an anti-starfighter vessel.
(actually that's an example of bad colon use, putting two together like that.)

I'm having trouble thinking of a good example of the other use of a semi-colon, which is surprising because I use it quite a lot. The important thing to remember is that both parts must be full sentences, with at least a subject and verb.


originally posted by Kordeth
In this case, "there" is a pronoun (at least according to Mirriam-Webster), and it should be "there are too many of them."

This has been your helpful grammar pedantry for the day.
Ah, you should see how many typing mistakes I made as I wrote that post. I kept spelling "grammar" "grammer."

Darth Fierce
25 April 2004, 04:57 AM
Mmm...makes me hungry for grammer crackers at my old grammer's house. Oh wait...:P

Darth Fierce :vader:

Ronin
25 April 2004, 07:30 AM
Heck, here in Jpn we've got a snack called "chocolate colon".
That's just WRONG!
:D

Dr_Worm
25 April 2004, 01:01 PM
A semi-colon can be used to join two complete sentences in to one without making it a run-on sentence. I cannot think of an example at the moment, but that is generally what they are used for. Actually I question the use of semi-colons as seperators in a list. I beleive that it is proper to use a comma. I could be wrong, but you might want to check an official source for that.

I agree that grammar gets in the way of communication, but at the same time I have come to expect it. Actually my poor typing skills and lack of interest in editing makes many of my posts make me look illeterate. What really annoys me is that some poeple belive taht because this is an informal medium that grammar is unnesisary. It is not so much that they don't know, it's that they don't care.

Kordeth
25 April 2004, 01:56 PM
Semicolons can be used as list seperators if the items in the list contain commas themselves, as I recall.

Grimace
25 April 2004, 02:35 PM
Such poor spelling or grammar tends to annoy me a bit, as well. I tend to gloss over them, though, as I don't expect everyone to be as well versed in English (American) and the grammar rules as I am (or others, it seems). One particular example that really grates on me is when people chop down the word "probably" to "prolly". :rolleyes: That is just pure laziness, and acts like fingers on a chalk board for me.

In fact, it makes me want to :sabersml:

Rogue Janson
25 April 2004, 03:56 PM
Examples of semi-colon use from things I've read today:

"The East Asian state is supposedly characterised by:
1. an elite bureaucracy staffed by the best managerial talent in the system;
2. an authoritarian political system in which the bureaucracy is given sufficient scope to take policy initiatives;
3. close government-big business cooperation in the policy making process."

That one's interesting because the points are also put into a numbered list.

"In a sense, the tragedy is that we did not win our freedom and democracy; we were beaten and received it."

In that example a full stop would actually be a rather odd separator, and a comma would also be appropriate.

While we're on the subject of things that annoy me: affect and effect. Not one that's so bad here, but I've seen people mix the two quite often on the message board for one of my modules, where they really should know better.

Dr_Worm
25 April 2004, 06:37 PM
While we're on the subject of things that annoy me: affect and effect.

That one drives us nurses nuts. When we see, on a patient chart, "Patient activity is minimal and his face displays a flat effect" it makes us want to scream.

Kordeth
25 April 2004, 07:55 PM
Ummmm.......isn't that the right way 'round, Worm? Affect is a verb, effect is a noun--or is that medical terminology I'm not aware of?

darth_wyld
26 April 2004, 12:34 AM
Since I'm no native speaker my spelling and grammar often lacks certain... refinement.

But I can fully understand what you mean!

In german there is a trend to 'americanize' the language. There are nearly no apostrophes in german.

German: Charlys Bar.
English: Charly's Bar.

I understand if it is a citation from english. But everyone puts apostrophes everywhere without knowing where they belong, like in 'Pizza's'.

But the worst thing I saw (rapidly approaching engrish):

'Do's and D'onts'

The only thing I could say was: 'D'oh!'

Wade Trenor
26 April 2004, 03:12 AM
effect - 1. result or consequence of an action...

affect - 1. to produce an effect on;
2. (of disease etc) attack (it affected his liver)...

This comes from the Australian Pocket Oxford Dictionary. ;)

Rogue Janson
26 April 2004, 03:23 AM
affect

tr.v.
To have an influence on or effect a change in: Inflation affects the buying power of the dollar.
To act on the emotions of; touch or move.
To attack or infect, as a disease: Rheumatic fever can affect the heart.

n.
Feeling or emotion, especially as manifested by facial expression or body language: “The soldiers seen on television had been carefully chosen for blandness of affect” (Norman Mailer).
Obsolete. A disposition, feeling, or tendency.
That's from dictionary.com. Using affect as a noun is very rare though, I can't recall ever seeing it used before.

the site also helpfully notes:


Usage Note: Affect and effect have no senses in common. As a verb affect is most commonly used in the sense of “to influence” (how smoking affects health). Effect means “to bring about or execute”: layoffs designed to effect savings. Thus the sentence These measures may affect savings could imply that the measures may reduce savings that have already been realized, whereas These measures may effect savings implies that the measures will cause new savings to come about.

Snib Snub
26 April 2004, 05:08 AM
Ever notice how much Loose is used in place of Lose? :rolleyes:

Now you will.

Rogue Janson
26 April 2004, 05:16 AM
aargh, don't remind me :mad:

Vanger Chevane
26 April 2004, 10:44 AM
The Apostrophe is also used in names to indicate a verbal "half pause", or where pronouncing a syllabic combination normally would result in the wrong sound.

In the post above, J'Patt would likely be pronounced either "jeh-pat" or "juh-pat", with the j sound clearly pronounced instead of pushed together with the following sound.


Another example would be Del'orin. Ppl would tend to break the syllables into "deh-lore-in", but the ' indicates the syllabic breaks are "del-orin".

Darth_Cassed
26 April 2004, 10:53 AM
i dont know what you people are talking about. I see no problem's with peoples punctuation nowaday's. quite complainin

:P

With the advent of the internet, remember the advent of shorthand typing ;) Most of us here on the HoloNet try to keep things as clear and well-written as we can, but it helps to be proficient in reading incorrect grammar on the internet.

All I can say is that we created the beast, can't get mad when it stomps on the language.

Snib Snub
26 April 2004, 11:45 AM
Originally posted by Darth_Cassed
With the advent of the internet, remember the advent of shorthand typing ;) Most of us here on the HoloNet try to keep things as clear and well-written as we can, but it helps to be proficient in reading incorrect grammar on the internet.

All I can say is that we created the beast, can't get mad when it stomps on the language.

Don't blame the tool for the individual's "stomping." That's like blaming a gun for killing someone. You must be a democrat. :P

Dr_Worm
26 April 2004, 04:37 PM
Using affect as a noun is very rare though, I can't recall ever seeing it used before.

It is the noun version that I do see quite often, though admittedly I am in a specific subset of individuals. A flat affect (procounced with a soft a instead of an "uh" sound) means that an indiviuals voice or face lacks emotional content. Robotic or zombie like. That definition is by no means obsolete in my everyday use.

Nova Spice
26 April 2004, 04:59 PM
Janson, I firmly believe the crux of grammatical misusage stems from too much "Americanization" of the English language. Modern American English has many sub-dialects.

For Example:

-What's up?
-What sup?
-Wassup?

Spoken, the above examples are uniformly indistinguishable, save for perhaps accentuation. Written, you can see a stark difference. I've noticed a trend of misusage when it comes to writing (typing) properly. Grammatically speaking, it seems that more and more people are not learning their (not there :D ) basic English skills.

I'm not sure how it is in England, though I hear whisperings that most folks on the British Isle still speak the King's English remarkably well. :D

Perhaps the colonists made a mistake when they decided to spell colour and armour, color and armor, in order to break away from true English?

Darth_Cassed
26 April 2004, 06:50 PM
Originally posted by Snib Snub


Don't blame the tool for the individual's "stomping." That's like blaming a gun for killing someone. You must be a democrat. :P

Actually Snib Snub.....I lean more to the Republican side! :D


But as we've seen from previous threads, we best not stray too far into politics ;)

Grimace
26 April 2004, 09:21 PM
Originally posted by Darth_Cassed

But as we've seen from previous threads, we best not stray too far into politics ;) [/B]

Yeah....Grrrr!:stormtpr: :wookiee: :stormtpr:
......................... :threepio:................



:boba: :vader:

Rogue Janson
27 April 2004, 01:57 AM
Originally posted by Nova Spice
Janson, I firmly believe the crux of grammatical misusage stems from too much "Americanization" of the English language. Modern American English has many sub-dialects.

For Example:

-What's up?
-What sup?
-Wassup?

Spoken, the above examples are uniformly indistinguishable, save for perhaps accentuation. Written, you can see a stark difference. I've noticed a trend of misusage when it comes to writing (typing) properly. Grammatically speaking, it seems that more and more people are not learning their (not there :D ) basic English skills.
I'm not sure It mind stuff like that quite as much really. That's slang, which can be annoying but has a place. The internet and mobile phones strongly encourage people to abbreviate words; if you're having serious IM conversations it's almost impossible to keep up if you don't.
At least when you write something like "prolly" though, there's a reason - you're saving yourself time, even if you might make yourself look stupid. But add something like an apostrophe in, or write "loose" instead of "lose" you're not just making yourself look stupid but going to extra effort to do it.


I'm not sure how it is in England, though I hear whisperings that most folks on the British Isle still speak the King's English remarkably well. :D

Perhaps the colonists made a mistake when they decided to spell colour and armour, color and armor, in order to break away from true English?
I think in Britain regional accents are perhaps more pronounced than in the US (where perhaps they are mre associated with social groups than areas?). For example, round here you'll hear people say things like "wurr's 'e to?" (where is he) or "gurt" (great). Until maybe a few decades ago I think you could find people speaking regional dialects (not just accents) fairly commonly, especially in certain parts of the country. I remember one of my teachers at school, who was probably around forty and from Yorkshire (N England), saying that when he went to school he could barely understand people from nearby villages (though this may be a bit of an exaggeration). I'm not sure how much these ever moved into written language though. I suspect schools (and printed media) have always been pretty strict on that sort of thing.

We do have a problem with the 'americanization' (complete with z) of the language, caused largely by US cultural preeminance (in film, TV, music etc.). USAmerican English probably does have an inherent tendency to simplification and reduction, dating back to the dropping of letters in colour, axe, etc..
That said, we can mess things up ourselves - such as the homogenisation of regional accents. In particular, Britain's such a centralised country, with media, communications, business etc. all based in London, what's known as (Thames) Estuary English is spreading across the country. The most prominent feature of this accent is the glottlestop - sample quote from one of my sisters: "I'm no' playin' the allegre'o 'cos i's go' too many do'ed no'es!"

Jame
27 April 2004, 06:25 AM
Sometimes something is worth getting upset over. For example, I find sniffling and coughing to be very rude, and the reason I give out for it is that it not only shows that the sniffler/cougher isn't taking care of himself (or whatever), but doesn't have the consideration for others to do it not in public. My rant's over, thanks!

Dr_Worm
14 May 2004, 02:25 PM
Okay Grimace sent me this, and admittedly, I am posting becuase I did so well. LOL


http://quizilla.com/users/BaalObsidian/quizzes/How%20grammatically%20sound%20are%20you?/]Grammer Test ( [url)
<img src="http://images.quizilla.com/B/BaalObsidian/1080162080_cturesgod3.jpg" border="0" alt="Grammar God!"><br>You are a <b>GRAMMAR GOD</b>!
<br><br>If your mission in life is not already to<br>preserve the English tongue, it should be.<br>Congratulations and thank you!
<br><br><a href="http://quizilla.com/users/BaalObsidian/quizzes/How%20grammatically%20sound%20are%20you%3F/"> <font size="-1">How grammatically sound are you?</font></a><BR> <font size="-3">brought to you by <a href="http://quizilla.com">Quizilla</a></font>

Rogue Janson
14 May 2004, 03:48 PM
Good on you, Gabriel. I'm a Grammar God as well apparently, even though I did just have to imagine I was talking in a very posh way for several of the questions.

Ardent
15 May 2004, 07:13 AM
Eeeewwww cell phone abbreviations. Don't get me started on this: especially not you British. I think people just get lazier the less direct a form of communication gets and it doesn't get a whole lot less personal than text messaging. Or as my British mates would send me: "txt msgg on the celly"... if they felt like saying more than was necessary.

Now, I'm not rigid and acumenical when sending text messages. I don't bother with a lot of implied punctuation or anything. But I like words damnit. Real words, not horrid abbreviations of words that take me five or six seconds to infer what they mean.

As far as grammatical and typographical errors go I'm pretty forgiving if it's just an obvious "oops." But if it's continued and obviously incorrect, that could bug me. I say could because oftentimes I simply skip posts with terrible grammar.

Spelling I am a lot more forgiving with, because even grammar gods make spelling oopses. As an aside, my own writing is a mishmosh of English English and American English too Rev. The whole time I was in Africa I was conscientous of which form I was using, but in my regular life I just sort of bungle on through (or thru) and drive my proof-readers nutty. I've got a mother to blame for that, though, as she spent most of her vocabulary formative years in Britain (and it rubs off).

Vanger Chevane
15 May 2004, 04:52 PM
Worm, do you know if the quiz will extrapolate on a question and its correct answer if one makes a mistake?

Due to my own Grammar Godhood, I'm not exactly certain. Mayhaps the quiz is too easy? :P

Dr_Worm
16 May 2004, 12:44 PM
No, V, it will not.

Emperor Xanderich II
17 May 2004, 07:27 AM
I think the regional accents in the UK are cool. It's great to be able to tell if someone's from Manchester, Liverpool, London, Wales, Newcastle or Yorkshire after they've spoken just a few words. I'm from north Manchester, so I don't have as harsh an accent as most 'Mancs' do. They talk like this:

"Eee'rrr! Giz uz yu wallet!" (molst of them are thieves)

Scouse (Liverpool) accents always make me laugh, but then maybe that's because I'm from Manchester which is only 30 odd miles away.

People from the South of England (Southerners) sound weak to people from the North (like me). Ahh, the good old North - South divide.

:atat:

Talonne Hauk
17 May 2004, 09:52 AM
It's amazing how those distinct dialects came about, considering the short distance. But then again, I'm from the NW 'burbs of Chicago. The trademark Chicago accent (Think of the SNL skit - Da Bulls! Da Bears!) is actually from the south side of Chicago. No one talks like that on the north side.

darth_wyld
17 May 2004, 10:09 AM
Oh wow! I'm proud. I didn't make it to grammar god, but at least made it to master...

I dont now wai zat culd bee.

johnnyputrid
17 May 2004, 10:59 AM
Being from the South, I've had to deal with bad grammar and spelling all my life. After a while you get used to it, but it's the funny new southern words that get me:

Funna. going to, as in "I'm funna head over there"
Fitt'na. fixing to, as in "I'm fitt'na go to the movies."
Dems. those, as in "I'm funna get me dems new rims."
Deybe.there are, as in "Deybe a lotta dems new Jordans in da mall."

Not quite Ebonics, not quite redneck slang, but a bizarre hybrid of the two, spoken equally by blacks, whites, and even Latinos, though they tend to throw Spanish in the mix, making yet another variation. They funny thing is, it is accepted for people to spell out these weird terms correctly. I've actually heard two people argue over the correct way to spell "fitt'na".:D

darth_wyld
17 May 2004, 11:21 AM
I could go on for hours which strange colorful variation the german language blossoms in the last years.

The influence of turkish english have created a slang that makes me cringe.

coldskier0320
18 May 2004, 07:39 AM
Oh good grief, dont get me started...I hail from the Pittsburgh area, whose people are known for, among other things, their atrocious botching of the English language, to give you an idea of what I deal with, a sampler:

Red up: to clean up, as in, "If you wanna go out tonight, you better red up your room."

Worsh: wash, note: also used as part of other words, "When we get to D.C., I wanna visit the Worshington monument."

Dahntahn: downtown, "Yunz wanna go dahntahn tonight?"

Yunz: you, or you all, basically 'you' plural, see previoous example. This is the trademark 'Pittsburghese' word.

Stillers: our very own football team, the Steelers, "Yunz wanna go see them Stillers on Sunday?"

Jaggerbush: thornbush, "When I wrecked my bike, I flew right into a jaggerbush and got all scraped up."

anat: literally, and that. used as a general catch-all, kinda like etc., some true Pittsburghers actually use this to mean nothing at all. A guy in our scout troop is known to finish a story like this: "Then we all went home, anat...*sigh*...anat.":rolleyes:

slippy: slippery

pop: any carbonated beverage

arn: iron, as in, "Welcome to the Arn City." or "You better arn that shirt if you wanna wear it."

arng: along the same lines, this one is 'orange' in disguise, "I'm hungry for an arng."

jeetjet: 'did you eat yet?' usually followed by, 'nojoo?' ;)

And these are jsut a few, if I think of others, I'll add to the list.

Brishti Kildruun
18 May 2004, 09:55 AM
Havn't been here in forever! (thanks YOU)

Here in good ole' Warren, NH, vocabulary is a whole different ballgame.

'a' and 'r' are often reversed when used as the last letters of a suffix, for instance, in the words store and vanilla: "I'm going down to the stowa(store)" and "I need the vanillar"

Infact, it is NOT "I'm goin down TO the stowa" 'to' is most often times completely removed from the vocabulary. "I'm goin down the stowa" or "Do you need me to take you up the house?" (One of my worst peeves)

Yes/yup is "iyugh" with a little emphasis on the "gh"...a little breath

there's a "bean suppa" almost every sunday night on the "common" (town square, etc.)however most of the time, there are in reality NO beans to be found.

Breakfast remains "breakfast", but lunch is referred to as dinner, dinner is supper.

"wicked" is used when something is amazingly cool, "That movie was wicked" or as an adjective of extremity "his sunburn was wicked bad!"

ofcourse sprinkles are jimmies, but I think thats a given along the Eastern Seaboard.

Can't seem to think anymore...sorry for the rambling, good to post though!

Rogue Janson
18 May 2004, 10:41 AM
Infact, it is NOT "I'm goin down TO the stowa" 'to' is most often times completely removed from the vocabulary. "I'm goin down the stowa" or "Do you need me to take you up the house?" (One of my worst peeves)
I think that might be quite common. An exchange in Somerset could go like this:
"Wurr's them cows to?"
"Oi saw 'em going up top field."


Breakfast remains "breakfast", but lunch is referred to as dinner, dinner is supper.
I have a friend from Zimbabwe who always claimed I'd be lied to over the meaning of "tea" and "supper" when I referred to my evening meals as tea.

Dr_Worm
18 May 2004, 12:00 PM
Well perhaps I did so well at grammer becuse the urban portions of Oregon, Washington, and Northern Califorinia are know for thie lack of accent. I heard a linguist give a lecture durring my broadcasting days and he stated that is the reason that most news casters are taught to talk like people of the pacific NW region. The rurual communities do a slight drawl, but not too pronounced.

However I would like to take a moment and defend the regional accents of this (and most) countries. It represents what is idea in america in my opinion: Multiple cultures without homoginization. People in the south have a long culture of individualism, but we all (now) live in relative harmony. Personlly I find accents to be staggeringly sexy. There are a few that grate on my ears, but that is a matter of personal taste. If everone in this huge county talked the same not only would it be boring, but it would be an indication of something seriously wrong. The idea od "standard" english is an academic one, and should not rule everyday life.

Rogue Janson
18 May 2004, 01:35 PM
Right on. Regional accents are part of our identities.
I have almost no regional accent at all, but here in Exeter (the regional accent is the same, but the uni is full of home counties people) I find myself emphasising what little I have. I also find myself drawn to people with local, even Welsh accents, simply as a rejection of the cultural dominance of the Southeast.

My mum has claimed in the past that it's a scottish trait to be strict on grammar and pronounciation (she doesn't have an accent herself) but I've never heard anyone else make the claim.

Accents are also still quite class based here, I don't know about in the US. My two younger sisters have progressively stronger accents than me simply because they've gone to school in a more working class area for (relatively) longer.

johnnyputrid
18 May 2004, 02:06 PM
Originally posted by Rogue Janson

Accents are also still quite class based here, I don't know about in the US. My two younger sisters have progressively stronger accents than me simply because they've gone to school in a more working class area for (relatively) longer.

That's actually quite true from my own experience growing up. Living in a working class Southern environment, my speech has always reflected that. My Southern drawl has pretty much faded with time, but I still speak in the same manner. I think it's cool that you can identify the general area where a person hails from by their accent. Where I grew up, in southern Florida, you had White Collar workers with little to no accent, Blue Collar workers with a noticable accent, and No Collar workers (my category;)) with heavy accents.

Ardent
18 May 2004, 03:16 PM
Originally posted by johnnyputrid
That's actually quite true from my own experience growing up. Living in a working class Southern environment, my speech has always reflected that. My Southern drawl has pretty much faded with time, but I still speak in the same manner. I think it's cool that you can identify the general area where a person hails from by their accent. Where I grew up, in southern Florida, you had White Collar workers with little to no accent, Blue Collar workers with a noticable accent, and No Collar workers (my category;)) with heavy accents.

Theoretically at least. I have what most people kindly describe as a "vocal pattern lacking in accent." I.E. I talk exactly like someone on TV trying to use "accentless" English. I'd guess that, if anything, it has to do with being raised around so many butcherings of the English language growing up that I simply rounded everything out and ended up square (no pun intended). :/ Funny that.

Emperor Xanderich II
19 May 2004, 07:23 AM
Originally posted by Brishti Kildruun
Infact, it is NOT "I'm goin down TO the stowa" 'to' is most often times completely removed from the vocabulary. "I'm goin down the stowa" or "Do you need me to take you up the house?" (One of my worst peeves)

Unless of course you're from the North West (of England), when the "to" becomes "t" eg "A'm goin' down t' shop." or "'Ave you signed up for that t'internet yet?" For a great example watch some Peter Kay!! He's great. Although he is from Bolton, and I'm from Bury, which is only 6 miles away, but you can easily tell the difference. Strange as can be, me thinks...