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View Full Version : Pleas comment on my story The Eye of The Sith



Jax Nova
28 October 2005, 03:58 PM
I would like honest opinioins of those who have read part or all of my story. I would like you to inform me of your opinion on how good it is.
Thank you for you time.

Jax Nova

Slave_1
4 November 2005, 10:20 AM
Greatings :)
Please don't take ANY of this reply personally, as it is intended as constructive critisizm and/or praise. As such, I will list the items that could be improved first.

Things to do/keep in mind while writting:
1) When refering to Bonadan, make sure you capitalize the word every time as it's a proper name. You missed a couple.

2) The Z-95 Headhunter never came with a hyperdrive system, or a navigation system to use it. It was inteded as an in-system patrol/fighter craft. Mara Jade had one that was heavily modified to include a hyperdrive, and so have a few others. I am writing this as I read your story, but this modification can work for you to get the main characters 'stuck' just where you need them.

3) Try to add more "depth" to your scenes. The first line in one part is:
The trio soon made there way to where they were scheduled to meet the contact.

First: What trio? Only two beings (Nadira and Ketra) are mentioned in this scene.

The 'depth' could be made greater with more detail. Something like:
The Jedi made there way to the through the bowels of the city, passing the harmless and some not so harmless denzians of city as they passed. It never ceased to amaze the Jedi master that intelligent being could ever choose to live in such squalid conditions.

4) Not everyone speaks with proper english or manners. Writting a 'voice' that is unique to each person is a very real challenge that every writter faces. This WILL get better with both practice and as you you discover the 'voice' that is your character.

5) When to use Itallics. When refering to ANY ship name, or to show translation from an alien language. As in example you wrote:
“They are in position,” a rodian bounty hunter informed Jezel.
Should have been:
"They are in position.", a Rodian bounty hunter informed Jezel. (Remember to capitalize species names as well)

6) Each time a new person is speaking, or we (the reader) are listening to his/her thought, it should be in it's own block of text. This signals the reader that a unique person is talking/thinking, and helps the flow of text to form an image in the mind with the least amount of effort.

Example, you wrote:
“They are in position,” a rodian bounty hunter informed Jezel. “Proceed with the plan. I want the m alive, with no permanent damage,” Jezel ordered. “As you wish,” the bounty hunter approved. “Once they are captured you will receive the remainder of your pay,” Jezel added for extra insentive.

Should have been:
“They are in position,” a rodian bounty hunter informed Jezel in his native laguage. (By adding "in his native language" you just informed the reader of a rule, so don't break it. The rule is everytime a person speaks in Italics, they are speaking in there native language. Some writers use italics for non-tranlated alian speak, "Oota-GooTa Solo...", then add () for the translation "(Long time, no see Solo)" )

“Proceed with the plan. I want them alive, with no permanent damage.” Jezel ordered. (I changed "damage," to "damage.". Its an order, so end with a period.)

“As you wish...” the bounty hunter approved.(Change "wish," to "wish...". the presance of three periods (...) denotes something left unsaid.)

“Once they are captured you will receive the remainder of your pay.” Jezel added for extra insentive. (Again changed "pay," to "pay.". Gives a note firm finality while at the same time lets the reader know that Jezel is done speaking.)

It is important to keep in mind formating. This is not always easy on forum post, but readers will appreciate the extra effort. After the text in the above example, with the way the forum displays text, it all appears as one long block of text. Breaking it up a bit will help the reader follow the story. At the same time a reader wont be discuraged by seeing a single block of text that takes up most of the screen. Breaks in the text tell the reader, "Hey, something is happening", where blocks appear to the reader as long narative.

7) I (this is my own opinion) don't want to see characters "rescued" by the great Luke Skywalker. I would rather see these two(if they both survive) overcome there situation and come out of it stronger and wiser for the experience.

Thing you got right:
1) Great story! I love the plot, and your descriptions of action scenes are nice.

2) As I progressed through the story, the "voices" Jezel and Kerta definetly started to diverge, and become unique. They are begining to become unique people in there world. As a reader, it is a great feeling to watch characters grow. :)

3) You chose to write Star Wars, always a plus in my book ;)

4) Your antagonists(the villians) are very well done. I really LOVE the reserved, cold, calculating villian. I feel they are so much more of a bad guy than the person on a rampage with little or no forthought. Those are better left as side steps to the main problem to move the characters where they need to be.

Genral Suggestions:
1) Read other post and make a list of what you did or didn't like. Think about things like character development, scene description, how well the scene fits with the overall plot, and formating of text.

2) Never use raw numbers(alomst). If someone 5' 6" tall, say they are "five feet six inches". The only sugestion should be if the character is reading text, like and access code. Even R2-D2 is refered to Artwo in books.

Example 1)
Brak is speaking to a flight control tower over the com-unit.
"This Brak Ferral, captain of the freighter Brak Pain requesting clearance for planet fall. Access code five niner niner seven."

Example 2) Brak looked at the secutiry information at the top of the message, "BR-9869-LKK". It was either from central command, or someone had effictivly sliced their newest encyption code.

3) Keep in mind that the Star Wars universe uses the metric system. Never use imperial (u.s. standerd). There are many sources available on the internet help you convert numbers.

4) Be as accurate as you can be with technical information. Like the earlier example with the Z-95's. If they have been modified with a hyperdrive, then tell the reader about it. There are many ways to make this modification, and with as old as the Z-95 is, no two are likly to be the same. Even in the same unit.

5) Don't be affraid to ask questions. This is a very friendly community, and most people are glad to answer questions you may have on just about anything SW related.

6) DONT STOP! This is probably THE most important suggestion. Writers write. So keep writing! :D

I hope this reply hasn't discuraged you. I really do like the potential you show in your writing, and I can't wait to see more :D

Jax Nova
4 November 2005, 11:08 AM
Thanks for all your assistance! I really appriciate all your tips. I would like to learn as much about the right way to write as possible and will accept any constructive critisim. I will keep in mind what you have said and try to impliment it in my story. :)

I allso agree with you that I don't want the rescued my Luke Skywalker. He is actualy going to play a verry small roll in this story. Ketra and Nadira are the main charectors, therefor they will be doing most of the activities. :)



if ANYONE else has something to add or would like to comment pleas do so! Thnx.

Jax Nova

Slave_1
4 November 2005, 12:12 PM
If your looking to get serious about writing, you can take a class for it, or you can learn by yourself. (That's what I have done.) There are many avenues of oppertunity. The ones I have chosen are:

)writing and postign here, getting some VERY good feedback from others

)reading what others have done, both here and in print.

)go to the library and get(or buy) a book or two on writing( I acttualy own way more books on this than I need, but my wife LOVES to write and we are both subscribers to WritersDigest.)

)as I said before, write, write, then write some more.

Story are still work, but the more you practice following the "conventional" rules, the easier they become to follow. A good web site for formating a manuscript (not a post on a message board but rather for your own writing in your own word proccessor) is this web site. (http://www.shunn.net/format/)

Hope this helps. :D

Jax Nova
4 November 2005, 12:32 PM
Thanks, I will look at the website. I have been looking on the internet for some educational things on writing. But I don't have much access to books. I really don't read much, but have been reading more so I know what to compare my own work to.

Are there any books that you would sugest?

Have you published any books? I ouwld like to some day but am not sure exactily how to know if it would be worth publishing them or not.

Slave_1
4 November 2005, 12:55 PM
Are there any books that you would sugest?

For novels:
Story Structure Architect by Victoria Lynn Schmidt, Ph.D. (Very good book for pre-planning your story)

For Any story of Any Length:
Dialog by Gloria Kempton (Great for how to write conversations, arguments, etc...)

Plot & Structure by James Scott Bell (Good alround book for plit driven stories.)

For gerneral writing practice:
The 3 A.M. Epiphany by Brian Kiteley (Lots of good excerices for when you get stuck, basically a guide to break writters block)

Any Grammer desk refence (I use the one y Lutz & Stevenson from Writers Digest)

There are only two types of stories, and every story ever written will fall in to one or the other. Plot driven (The events force the character to move) and Character driven(The growth of the character moves the plot).


Have you published any books?

Not in a VERY long time, and then only in trade few magazines. No novels, yet. I have been working on (off and on) one for about two years.


I ouwld like to some day but am not sure exactily how to know if it would be worth publishing them or not.

As long as there is even a hint that someone else would enjoy your work, then yes, you should publish. Just don't do it for the money. If you do, it will never happen. If you write to tell a good story first, then to share that story, the money will follow. If you start with the money in mind, those thoughts will keep you from writing the great ideas that are within you.

Jax Nova
4 November 2005, 01:43 PM
Cool, thanks for the list. I will have to look into them.

So what is the book you are writing about?

WEll, I have finished who knows how many books. My latest I was thinking about getting it published and I am having my mom and my Brother do the editing. I was thinking about sending it into a POD ( print on demand) web site it is called Xulon Press ( If it is spelled right )

Would it be better to try to do that or go to a normal publisher. Because this way no mater what they will publish my book, and it's not that expensive.

I have a small income because I am not old enough to get a job yet, so I have to be careful with the costs and stuff.

Slave_1
4 November 2005, 02:47 PM
Its not just the cost of printing. POD and Self Publishing houses like Vantage Press WILL get you in to print. What a 'normal' publisher bring to the table is research. They will make ABSOLUTLY sure that there is no hint of copywrite infringment in your work before publishing. If there is even a question, they will inform you, and even (in most cases) propose changes that fit the story and your 'style' to clear up the issue. Other means do not, and you must do the research yourself.

Take Star Wars for example. Lucas is very libral with copyrights, and even encourages fan-films,fiction,etc...

Try to make even one dime on it with out his "Epressed Written Concent" and his lawyers will come down like a sledge hammer. If you have written a Star Wars novel, then I suggest writting a letter of inquiry to the publisher (I think it's Bantom books) to get info on the process invloved. Just in case it is them, here is there contact info from the 2006 Novel & Short Story Writers Market: (Having a writers market of any catagory is invaluable once your ready to submit your work)

BANTOM DELL PUBLISHING GROUP
Random House Inc., 1745 Broadway, New York NY 10019, (212)782-9000. Fax: (212)782-8890. Web Site: www.bantomdell.com. Established 1945. "In addition being the nations largest mass market paperback publisher, Bantom publishes a select yet diverse harcover list." Publishes hardcover, trade paperback and mass market paperback originals; mass market paperback reprints. Average 350 titles/year.
Imprint(s) Bantom Hardcover; Bantom Trade Paperback; Bantom Mass-Market; Delacorte Press; The Dial Press; Delta; Dell.
Needs Adventure, fantacy, horror.
How to Contact Accepts simultaneous submissions.
Terms Offers advance. Publishes manuscript 1 year after acceptance.


If you have any question let me know :)

Slave_1
4 November 2005, 02:51 PM
I just tried the link, the writers market is wrong, it doesn't work. Here is the real web addy.

http://www.randomhouse.com/bantamdell/

sorry bout that :rolleyes:

And yes, it is them who handles ALL of the SW Series books, however the listing also these codes:
1) Subsidiary of larger publishing house
2) Publisher accepts agented submishionsw only (meens you need an agent)
3) Award-Winning Market

Hope all this helps :)

Jax Nova
4 November 2005, 05:24 PM
Copy write infringment is when yo use something that is already copywrited right? If that is the case then on my books it should not be a problem because I make it all up compleetly. It is scienc fiction.

If I am wrong about the copy write infringment please inform me.

What kind of research are you talking about?

Slave_1
4 November 2005, 08:13 PM
In the United States, anything you write, and I mean anything(including the stories you have posted on here), is copyrwritten to you. This can be on paper, or on a pc. This includes everything you have ever created, and everything created by others is copywritten to them. This is to protect you from other people trying to profit from your creativity, and to protect everyone else from you trying to do the same.

Now it gets sticky. In the book (and the original movie) DUNE by Frank Herbert, there was a combat simulator with variuos ways of killing the student. The name of this machine the "R" for robot, Version 2, or the "R2". Lucas sued Frank Herbert in court for copywrite infringment and won, even though Mr. Herbert proved he come with up with name years earlier. The very fact that Lucas used the name for a "robot" AND put it out for the public(Frank Herbert included) first, ment there was the posability that he actually got the name from EP-IV: A New Hope. So he was found guilty and never used the name again in any book.

The research comes in when you submit your manuscript to the editor, and sometimes (if you have one) your agent wil catch it first. But if not, then the editor, who decides to give the manuscript a fair shake, sends it to "research". While there you work is maticulasly torn apart. Every name you use checked.

Such as, no one else can create a desert planet named Tatooine, or Dune, with out infringing(crossing the line) on the saftey and protection that copywrites provide to the respective authors. No one can use the term "Warp Drive" as the term is copywritten and trademarked by the creators of Star Trek.

Since the term HyperSpace is in the "Public Domain" (meening absolutly nobody has a copywrite on it and nobody ever will) Most Sci-Fi writters default to that. However, you can create your own way of space travel as well. Stargate is a good example, and I cant remeber the name of the book, but I read about a "Gap" drive once, very cool device and a great book. What you CAN NOT do, is rename a "Warp Drive" (A device that provides motion by "Warping" the space around the vessle) and call it your own.

Thats what the research is for. To check to make sure that your story dosn't have a Magician with a Sword made of Light that comes from Desert world that has Giant worms on it. (Jedi on Dune.) This protects you AND the publisher as they are liable for printing it, and trying to make money on it as well.

If you print it yourself, then onyone can claim you stole thier idea, or your character is based upon some one real and they can take you to court. Even if you win, you still must pay court and legal fees. These lawyers are called Tort lawyers and why you hear from time on the news about "Tort Reform". Because in the U.S. its a lawsuit lottery. If someone looses, no big deal. At most they pay court costs. If they win, they win big, as settlements are commonly in the millions of dollars.

Yes you can "Self-Publish", just be aware of the dangers that go along with it. Even if your stories are 110% original, there is always someone who will say, "Hey I told him about that back in the third grade, it was game I made up and now he is making money from it, and I want my cut.", even if it's a lie.

It is very unfortunate that this is the current state of affairs in the litterary world, but it is the reality. In the U.K. for example, if someone files a lawsuit against you, and they loose, they must pay for your court cost, and ALL of your legal bills. Needless to say, the U.K. doesn't have a big problem with frivolous lawsuits.

My suggestion is to AT least start to research an agent, they can at least (ussually for a fee) check for copywrite infringments for you, and they have MANY contacts in the publishing world, and will let you know how marketable your storie(s) are. Keep in mind that litterly thousands of new books apeer each year on the market. And you must be unique, while at the same time using a format that people have become used to.

Please don't take any of this as discouragement, many writters self-publish every year, the market for it growing (as is evident by POD services). Just make sure you cover your all bases first. If you wish to self publish, here some guide lines.

1) Include the following statement at the beging and end of your book (or something like it):
This book is not based on any persons real or imagined other than those created by author for use with this book. All situations protrayed in this book are ficticious and are not based on any real or imagined events. (Look at the begining and ending credits for movies and you will see a similiar disclaimer, and use it at both ends)

2) Do NOT let ANYONE read your work unless you know you can trust them (such as your parents) untill it is printed.

3) Do NOT let ANYONE "give you ideas" for your stories(Including your parents). ("Jane: I told him to kill that character in chapter 9 and he did, give me MONEY!")

4) It always a good idea to have someone else "critique" your work. One of the best ways it to create a questionair for people to fill out, and on that paper, list VERY clearly something like "Please do NOT make any suggestions on how to make it better. Just state what you liked and didn't like about anything you have read regarding this matter. If you choose to submit ideas, then you do so of your own free will and the author is free to use said ideas as his/her own with NO compensation to you monitarilly or otherwise, and you forfiet any and all rights to submited ideas." (Make them sign it with a witness signiture or have them get it notorized BEFORE you accept it. Most banks will do this for account holders for free and is the better route.)

5) RESEARCH! Use Google AND Yahoo AND a few others, type in the name of your charcters, places, items, etc... and see what comes up. Some names are obvious, Like John Doe, and Jack Smith. No problem there. In fact there is a line book called "Death Lands" were guns are called "Blasters". Since these are "normal" guns no infringement, but if they fired a laser beam, Lucas would have the Author AND the Publisher by the short hairs. Wikipedia.org (http://en.wikipedia.org/) is also a good source to look.

6) If you get a match when searching then see what its about it. If, for example, you call a rather large reptile in your story a dragon, your fine. If you call it a Krayt Dragon, Lucas has you. If you disguish them by color(red breaths fire, while breaths ice, etc..), as in AD&D, Wizards of Coast has you. BUT, if you have a dragon that is red, breaths fire, and is generaly nasty, no harm done as this is considered a "typical" creature from mythology. But you start adding other colors and they work the same way, then its a problem.

7) After all of the work is done, the story is finished, the last line writ, then, have it looked at by others. And not the entire work. Just one to two chapters at MOST. Tell them if they want to read the entire thing they will have to wait untill you get it back from the printers. This actually works well, people LOVE suspence and surprises. If they some incentive to give you want you want, tell them they get a free signed copy when it comes out. People eat that up. Just make sure you actually do give it to them, becasue then they will be MORE than happy to help with the next book.

The sad truth in all this is that the litterary world is as cut throat as any industy in the busness world today. If you choose to self publish, you are entering that world. If you get an agent, and go through a publisher, you are shielded from most of it, as it is the agents job to handle such details, but they get a cut of the profit as well.

Each path has its good sides and bad sides. Just remeber, while an agent is SUPPOSE to be looking out for you, he is there to make money, just as the publisher is. Unfortantly so are many others that will not discrimate based on age, sex, color, religon, or anthything else if they think they can get free money out you.

Personally, I say go for it! There is no greater in high in the world than having someone say, "Aren't you so-and-so? I read your book!". Now that you are aware of whats out there, forget everything I have told you, for now. Concentrate on writing, on creating truly great fiction. As I said before, this forum is great starting place, as are others. Begin instead by looking for writing contest that cover Sci-Fi/Fantacy/Horror(The three are often lumped together as elememts are easily intercangable from one to the other). Enter them and see what happens. Don't worry about getting "published" until you win one. Usualy the winning entry gets published anyway. Then you will be a published author, then Agents and publishers will seek you out. As a side note, I trash can around three or four offers from agents and agencies a month. While I no longer write for money, and they get trashed, it's still a good feeling to get them. ;)

Jax Nova
5 November 2005, 06:03 AM
Ok, so how ould I find somone to help me find out if all the things I used in my book are ok?

PsychoInfiltrator
5 November 2005, 01:15 PM
POD and Self Publishing houses like Vantage Press WILL get you in to print. What a 'normal' publisher bring to the table is research. They will make ABSOLUTLY sure that there is no hint of copywrite infringment in your work before publishing. If there is even a question, they will inform you, and even (in most cases) propose changes that fit the story and your 'style' to clear up the issue. Other means do not, and you must do the research yourself

IOW,

Try to get 'a normal publisher' to publish it, and if they think they want to print it, they'll research it.

Slave_1
5 November 2005, 01:19 PM
See the post just above this one. ;)

Jax Nova
7 November 2005, 10:29 AM
So that is the only way?

Slave_1
7 November 2005, 02:42 PM
Not at all. You CAN go with POD, or a self-publisher, it's just not advisable too for legal reasons. Going with an established publisher is the BEST way to go.

Once you get an agent, you no longer submit directly to publishers. You send two to three chapters of your story to your agent. If (s)he likes what (s)he reads, then they will ask for the rest of the story. If not, they will tell you EXACTLY what they dont like or what changes you need to make before proceeding. Either way, they will ensure that only your BEST work gets to the publisher for review. (This is also protects your image as a writter).

Once it gets past your agent, as stated above it goes to 'A' publisher. You don't always get a say in which one, but sometimes you will. In the begining it is best to listen to your agent, as they have been 'in the buisness' for a while. The agent (or agency) will know what type of work you have written, and the best places to pitch the book, as well as how much to ask and negotiate for.

Once they have a publisher that will print and market your book, they (the publisher) sends your agent 'A' contract for review. Once the details are hammered put, your agent forwards the contract to you. It is VERY VERY VERY important to read ALL of the contract BEFORE you sign it. If you have any questions, you can call your agent, or hire a seperate lawyer to help you with it.

Once you are happy with the terms, you sign one copy (you are usually sent a duplicate for your records) and you send it back to your agent. Your agent makes notorized copies of it, and keep one for there records, sends one to the publisher that will be handling your work, and they send you back yet another copy (this one has your signiture on it) So that you can compare the two copies and make sure your name wasn't added to something you didn't agree too.

Right around this same time, your agent, with the publisher, begins to setup appointments for you to promote your book. These can book signings at a book store, to radio interviews depending on the subject matter of your book.

Just before it hits the stands, usually 1-2 months, you will get 10-100 copies for yourself, and to help you promote your own book and generate sales. This will also let you see the finished product, and it is again VERY important to look over it VERY carefully, and dont be affraid to nit pick. Look for things like the spelling of proper names, and any puncuation(or even entire chapters) they changed (it's called ghost writing and happens to ALL books).

If your satisfied, you do nothing. If not, call your agent, and see about getting whatever you found fixed. It is VERY important to do this ASAP. This gives the publisher more time to make the changes before they get shipped to customers.

After about 3-4 months of stress, book signings, and other ways of promoting, your done. Sit back and collect royalties. You will get your biggest check in the first 90 days of the books release. After that expect a steady decline as most people who are going to be reading your work, probably already have.

So whats next? Write another one and get it to your agent to start the process all over again. Once you get 20-30 titles in print, you will get checks from your agent once per month or quarter (depending on your contract), and you will be able to afford a very nice life for yourself. That is of course, if everything above goes off with out any problems.

And all this work, this stuff, is ussually done with out you even knowing it's going on. Which (in my humble opinion) is the way it should be. This will leave you, the writer, less stressed about the 'buisiness of writing' so all you have to really worry about is writing to your best ability.

Yes, POD will get you in to print, but it will not sell your book, or provide ANY legal protections for you, the author. In fact POD services clearly state in the usage agreements that they "print what is sent to us, and are not resposible for copywrite or trademark violations. Please refer all comments regarding such matters to the author of the material in question."

You send it, they print it. That's it. They will not even get involved with the issue if you get sued, except to say yes, you sent it to them, and they printed it, but that all.

Jax Nova
8 November 2005, 06:05 AM
So If I were to send my book to a publisher would I need an agent to look over it first?

And if so where would I find an agent to do this?

AS far as the book signings and promotions go, how important are they? Because in my position I don't know if I would really be able to do that kind of stuff.

Slave_1
8 November 2005, 11:02 AM
So If I were to send my book to a publisher would I need an agent to look over it first?
Not nessecarily. Some publushers accept direct submitions, but not all. It's just a good idea to have one.



And if so where would I find an agent to do this?
There is a long running 'series' of books called "Writer's Market 200X", where X is the year it is for. The newest ones are 2006. Some are specialized, such as "Novel & Short Storie Writer's Market". They contain a list of contact information of publishers, and agents, sorted by catagory. However this is only the first step. Once you have the basic info, it is best to send a Self Addressed Stamped Envelope to each one you might be instrested in along with a letter requesting submition information and any other details you need to be aware of. This is because things like guideline, what there looking for, manuscript length(s), can all change, and sometimes they do. So these books are not 100% accurate, as I said, It's a starting point.


AS far as the book signings and promotions go, how important are they? Because in my position I don't know if I would really be able to do that kind of stuff.
The people who are in the business of setting them up claim they can make or break a book. While I wont say they are not imprtant, they can help generate sales of your book, at least in the short term, not doing one won't cause your book to be a flop either. And even in your situation, they can be setup localy at local book stores and on weekends, or even at your school. Just the fact that you wrote a book, and got it published, will create enough curiosity that at least half the people at your school will most likely buy a copy, the faculty will also no dought. They generally last 4-6 hours, and you're ussually only asked to do one or two when your getting started. If your not comfertable being in the public eye, there is no rule that says you have to do them. You dont even have to have your real name on your book.

Stephen King, when he was first getting started, got tired of being rejected so he chose a "Pen Name", and wrote under the name Richard Bachman (You can find all of those stories in an antholgy of sorts titled Bachman Books). Once he chose a Pen Name, people started to take notice. No one clearly knows why this works for some and not for other, but if you get turned down it might be worth a try. A Pen Name also gives you a level of anonimity (privacy) to keep over zelouse fans from knocking on your door at 3 am to get an autograph.

If you look at William Shunn's sample novel format (http://www.shunn.net/format/novel.html) you will see how this is done. On the first page of the manuscript, your "real" information goes in the Top Left of the page as always, but under the title, he puts "a novel by Zachary Scribner". Zachary Scribner would be his Pen Name in this example. This tell the editor what name to put on the front of the book. Many "New" writers will start with a Pen Name until they are established as notable writers. That way, if there book does flop, they can just change there Pen Name and keep working. Once they use a name that start's to gain notoriaty, they start to come out with there real name, ussually accross two or three books, so that fans can keep finding there work and buying there books.

A good way to see this first hand is to check the sidebars on the inside of book covers. Some of them will say something like "Zachary Scribner is the Pen Name for William Shunn, he lives is Utah, and attends school there.", or something like that. An author would use the Pen Name for 2 or three books in that way then begin releasing books under his real name.

I realize this is probably more information then you were looking for, but there it is anyway :D

Jax Nova
8 November 2005, 03:30 PM
Where would I find the "Writers Market 200X" books?

As far as the publisity thing I live in a town with like 100 people and I am homeschooled so I really don't have much contact with very many people. We are allso far away from any big citys. Would this cause me to have to travel a long ways to do the publisity set-ups?

The amount of information is fine with me. ( as long as you don't mind writing it all )

Slave_1
8 November 2005, 06:39 PM
Where would I find the "Writers Market 200X" books?
Any library would have them, or have access to them. Most libraries, if they don't have a book in stock, then can get it in. This is free at any public library. You can also buy one from Amazon.com or maybe Ebay.


As far as the publisity thing I live in a town with like 100 people and I am homeschooled so I really don't have much contact with very many people. We are allso far away from any big citys. Would this cause me to have to travel a long ways to do the publisity set-ups?
Most likley yes, but not neccearily. Besides, once you get published, I am sure your parent will be proud enough of your accomplishment that they would be than willing to help in getting you were you needed go. Parents are great that way :D


The amount of information is fine with me. ( as long as you don't mind writing it all )
No at all :D

Jax Nova
9 November 2005, 08:04 AM
Ok thanks,. I will look into it and see about getting a copy of it.

:)

Slave_1
10 November 2005, 09:22 AM
I have been reading your latest updates to the The Eye Of The Sith, and I must say, nice job! :D You have shown a lot of improvment. The latest post was very readable :)

Jax Nova
10 November 2005, 02:12 PM
Thanks. I did allot more thinking on that last one, and tried to put more volume into it if you know what I mean.

I was inspired to write then, just felt like writing something. :)

I read you'r story allso. I am interested in seeing where you are going to take it. I allso was able to form a fairly good picture in my mind about the events so I supos that is good. :)

Jax Nova
10 November 2005, 02:17 PM
I found the writers market 2006 on amazon and will probably get one sometime.

What time will they come out with the one for 2007?

Might just wait until then to get one.

Slave_1
10 November 2005, 10:28 PM
Keep in mind this is still only 2005. They usually come out late summer of the preceding year. I got mine just a few weeks ago.

Slave_1
11 November 2005, 01:52 AM
I hate double posting, but here goes. :D

You may want to wait until you have a finished product to market, before you start trying to market it. It can vey hard for new writters to wait. They want to know everything and know it yesterday. My advice is wait til then. If you already have something to market, then get one as soon as you can. :D

Jax Nova
11 November 2005, 10:45 AM
I figured that they would come out later in the year, but the book that I was thinking about publishing I am thinking about not publishing now so that will give me time to work on a new idea I came up with not long ago.

Since I do not need it now I figured that by the time the next one comes out I might be ready.

But between then and now I figure if I go over the prcess enough I will have it down when the time comes. :)

WEll, thanks for all your help again.

darkforcerising
4 December 2005, 10:32 AM
I just started getting into the fan fic on this site, and I must say I liked this one. It got much better as I read it and now I've really been able to get into the scenes and characters. It was a little difficult to differentiate the characters at first but I am beginning to hear the distinct voices emerging now. Please keep it up! I want to know how it ends.

Jax Nova
5 December 2005, 06:18 AM
Thanks, I am planning to keep it going until the end..might be a little while though.

Slave_1
5 December 2005, 07:04 PM
Is there ever really an end? ;)

Great story :) keep up the good work :)

Jax Nova
6 December 2005, 07:22 AM
Thanks. I had decided on an ending point for it, so eventualy it will come to an end yes. Then, I get to start on another idea that poped into my minde. Heheh... so fun.

Slave_1
6 December 2005, 01:18 PM
Why wait?

Jax Nova
7 December 2005, 02:49 PM
Basicly because I can't spend much time on the comuter so to limit my time spent I just stick to one until it's finished.

Slave_1
8 December 2005, 11:31 PM
Great job Jax! I think I am hooked on your story :) The ball of light was a nice touch, most unexpected :D

Darth Fierce
9 December 2005, 05:02 AM
Originally posted by Slave_1
Take Star Wars for example. Lucas is very libral with copyrights, and even encourages fan-films,fiction,etc...

Try to make even one dime on it with out his "Expressed Written Concent" and his lawyers will come down like a sledge hammer. If you have written a Star Wars novel, then I suggest writting a letter of inquiry to the publisher (I think it's Bantom books) to get info on the process invloved. Just in case it is them, here is there contact info from the 2006 Novel & Short Story Writers Market: (Having a writers market of any catagory is invaluable once your ready to submit your work)


Just a few comments here:

--First, Del Rey, not Bantam publishes Star Wars books at the current time.

--Second, do not think you can send a Star Wars novel to Del Rey and expect it to be published without first being approached by Lucasfilms Ltd.. The last time I checked, Lucasfilms Ltd. did not accept unsolicited materials. All of the current Star Wars novelists became Star Wars novelists because they were invited by Lucasfilms Ltd. to do so.

Sorry if that puts a damper on your aspirations :( but don't give up writing Jax, it's a great way to exercise your creativity and imagination.

Darth Fierce :vader:

Slave_1
9 December 2005, 09:20 AM
Thanks for the correction :) I don't think I have of the newer books (such as NJO). I have read a few, just can't get used to the Vong.


--Second, do not think you can send a Star Wars novel to Del Rey and expect it to be published without first being approached by Lucasfilms Ltd.. The last time I checked, Lucasfilms Ltd. did not accept unsolicited materials. All of the current Star Wars novelists became Star Wars novelists because they were invited by Lucasfilms Ltd. to do so.

Exactly. The same holds true for most large genres. All of the Star Trek series, Babylon 5, Andromida, etc...

None of them publish unsolicited materials. They get flooded with it anyway, but they NEVER use it. This isn't because they don't care about there fans, in fact they care very much. The producers have planned out a path for each series or individual book and know what direction they want to keep the story line going on. This garuntees consistancy as well as crushes most petty arguments before they can start. (If they published one fan fic they would be obligated to consider them all.)

Jax Nova
9 December 2005, 09:31 AM
Yeah. Makes sense. I herd that George Lucas even reads through every starwars book published to be sure it does not have something out of place so to speek.... not sure if that's acurate or not though.

Slave_1
9 December 2005, 09:34 AM
Nit pickers can always find something that is out of place (just read some of the other forum threads). ;)

Jax Nova
9 December 2005, 09:48 AM
Yeah, I am sure they could. But after all, no one is perfect.

Slave_1
9 December 2005, 12:14 PM
Just finished your latest update. Great job! :D Very emotinal, I loved it :)