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View Full Version : Looting - Hey, this isn't D&D or EverQuest here!



Paul Klein
4 August 2002, 02:59 AM
My players have a tendency to loot most anything of value from their foes. One time, they wiped out a group of, oh, about 15 pirates. One of the players grabbed a bag and threw all the guns the corpse's guns into the bag. "I can sell these later and make ph4t c4$h!"

They also once took over a broadcast relay ship from a group of pilots and engineers... they took care of them (they we're baddies anyway) and decided to just keep the ship.

I know that in D&D, looting everything and anything is commonplace and expected. But it simply is NOT in keeping with everything Star Wars is about to act like that (in my opinion).
I told the player that lugging around the bag would be dangerous. He said "It's kewl! I'll just dr0p it on the ground when we get into a fight!"

So he loses an action, but its worth a chunk of credits... isn't it? What more can I do?

I'm really not looking for temporary solutions either. Saying that he set the bag down, and when he wasn’t looking, someone swiped it. 1) That’s way too incredibly obvious that I am being a bastard and trying to take their fun away. 2) Best case scenario... they’ll shrug their shoulders and just do it the next time they get into a fight. I can't have some convenient occurrence happen every time...

By the way... after they sold the Broadcast Relay Ship, after I went home I realized that the ship dealer would most assuredly ask for the ship's registration and wouldn't buy it once he found out they didn't own it. But then I realized... "Okay, every time they steal a ship, they'll just forge some registration, and one of the players will pump his Forgery skill to max just for that purpose".

Anyone else have this problem? What realistic solutions can you offer me?

Thanks!

EDITED ( for spelling and grammer errors)

ALFRED_THE_EWOK
4 August 2002, 03:10 AM
I have experienced the "moron with sack" problem before, you have my symapthies. In my case though, he eventually grew out of it. If this doesn't seem to be working, have them fight droids w/ a built in self-destruct, or things like that. Try to not give them the opportunity to grab everything that's not nailed down. Then there's always the "get captured and lose all equipment" plotline, which is sort of a temporary fix. If all else fails, tell them to stop acting like morons.

Fab
4 August 2002, 05:28 AM
As far as the broadcast relay ship, I'm sure it was stolen from somewhere, from someone. The police, or whatever equivalent of police in your game, should be out looking for it. Let them get incarcerated, all their found loot impounded. Add a few months onto their sentence for all the illegal weapons they had in the sack.

Or let some bounty hunter who is tracking the pirates come after them. "But we're not the pirates, we killed the pirates and took their ship!"

"Likely story, I'm taking you to Jabba. Explain it to him before he kills you."

As far as merely toting weapons around, I'm sure the stuff they grab is illegal in most systems. Again, let them get inspected, arrested, tried, and convicted. That might straighten them up a bit.

Also, don't forget the encumbrance rules. Unless these guys are body builders, they shouldn't be able to tote around a sack of guns all day without major penalties.

Or make them have to go through some tight squeeze to get to the end of a scenario which means they have to stash the guns somewhere before they enter the maze, labyrinth, narrow passage, whatever. Just make sure the scenario ends with them being forced to leave by some other route, leaving their guns behind.

Of course, if these guys are becoming pirates in their own right, which it sounds like they're doing, then let bounty hunters, or police, or pirate hunters, or crimelords, be looking actually for them. These guys should be angering quite a few people with their tactics. Put them in a very tough situation, let them get smacked around a bit.

But if worse comes to worst and they refuse to bite on anything, if it was me, I'd dock their experience points. They're not learning anything, they're stealing things. The cash is their reward. Just let inflation and or taxes take most of that cash away from them, and they'll be left with second level hooligans and thugs the rest of their natural lives until they straighten up.

Vanger Chevane
4 August 2002, 05:54 AM
If your players are some sort of military (Imperial, New Republic, what have you), most modern RL military regs place Looting under the Black Marketeering Criminal Code.

With penalties up to spending the next 40 years breaking large boulders down to fine sand, or execution, Looting suddenly becomes very unattractive as there's always some Goody-two-shoes who'll report you and/or you'll have to bribe your way out of it, which may very well cost you much more than you swiped in the first place.

Also, firefights usually bring reinforcements. The trick is to get out of the area before a significantly larger force arrives. That can be hard or impossible to do if you waste several minutes after the battle stripping everything.

I'dve let the Relay Ship get off a distress call. While the PC's are in the middle of raiding it, a military Capship drops in to investigate. They'll have to drop everything and run for their lives or be captured, tried, and convicted of Piracy. Everybody make new characters, please.

Or let the party be interrupted/intercepted by real pirates or criminals. If the party's lucky, they'll only lose their ill-gotten gain to the Professionals. If they mange to defeat the criminals, a sizable chunk of what they get will be illegal, hard to move,and a liability every time Authorities look at em.

They'll also lose some reputation for being associated with criminals.


If Looting regularly becomes more trouble than it's worth, they'll leave the sack at home.

Grimace
4 August 2002, 12:46 PM
There's some good ideas given out. They all boil down to one main thing: Don't let your characters play in a vacuum. Let their actions have reprecussions. Every time I've ever seen this type of problem in a game, it's because the GM didn't take into account what would happen.

It looks like you put a little thought into it, but were scared with the potential results. What you need to do is look beyond your first choice and go with option 2, 3, 4, and 5.

As was suggested, for the stolen ship, registration is a must. Sure, they may go into forgery, but they will have forgotten that the ship is stolen and someone has probably reported the loss already. Too many ships stolen results in organized groups of professionals going after the "pirates"...something that may spook the heck out of the players.

For the weapons, you can work it almost the same. They can only sell to black marketeers, and those guys are never trustworthy or friendly. What happens when one of those guys goes "Hey, deez guns are some that I poichased jus' las' month. You must be the ones raidin' my warehouses! Get 'im boys!"

There's lots of reprecussions, you just have to think of them. :)

Corsair
5 August 2002, 06:14 AM
Heh. Looting of dead bodies by PCs can get very annoying. So I pretty much made it so that anytime the PCs wanted to loot - they got nothing or "damaged beyond repair stuff". This has pretty much stopped them from looting every single dead body.

Not that I dont allow them to loot. On occassion, I allow them to get things, but thats only when I think its necessary or I can let it happen.
(Recenetly, my PCs acquired specialised weaponary for fighting Yuuzhan Vong, however, as it is specialised, ammo is very very rare so it cannot be used too often.)

The main reason my PCs loot bodies is to sell stuff for credits anyway. So usually, I make them find some exotic weapon that they can only use if they have the EWP for it or take massive penalties to their attack bonus.

PCs dont like to waste feats. Its a good deterrent.

Just remember. You are GM. When you roll a 1, you can make it to be a 20. :D

Ravager_of_worlds
5 August 2002, 07:24 AM
I started giving DSPs for excessive looting. after all, greed became the factor for killing people. After that, the more refined players took the hint. the more evil players learned the hard way about used equipment. blaster pistols started shorting out... power packs would drain themselves leaving no shots... they learned to trust only store bought stuff.

plus, they learned that dealing with the Black Market was very dangerous.

The_Anarchisto
5 August 2002, 08:11 AM
I think the ship is simple enough to deal with - Grimace and others have some great ideas.

However, I don't see what the problem is with letting your heroes sell off weapons. It's going to have to be on the black market (and there's a whole slew of potential plot hooks right there), and even then at only 50-75% value.

Then, simply make the missions cost more. Make them pay to rent a speeder, and then pay to replace it when the stormies either impound or destroy it. I made my characters have to buy an informant out of a gambling debt - or fight the assorted thugs there to collect - to the tune of $15,000 credits. They didn't stay filthy rich for long.

Just an idea.

The Anarchisto

incantator
5 August 2002, 09:19 AM
I agree that selling weapons should not be very easy. I would say that it is so difficult to sell a large group of weapons that without knowing a weapons dealer (using the contact special ability in D20), the characters could not sell more than one weapon in any given month. Looting then becomes a fairly cumbersome endeavor. The only looting that I would find truly acceptable would be taking the power packs from blasters. Of course, only a few of these packs would still work after the battle and of the few, none would have a full charge.

Tony J Case, Super Genius
5 August 2002, 11:03 AM
Or how about this -

for ship jacking, how about all kinds of built in security systems. If the piot doesnt input the correct code within oh say half an hourof liftoff, the ship shuts down completly and sets off an emergency beacon. Or the self destruct starts counting down. Or the ships Quick Return system engages the autopilot and returns the ship to a pre-designated point - such as the heart of a crimelord's lair. Or perhaps the life support systems shut down, leaving the ship intact but the theives dead.

If they jack an imperial ship - well, lets try this out. The Base Commander makes an ID on the party, and puts two and two together: "Hey, these guys love stealing ships!" He sets up a Imperial shuttle on a landing pad that makes a tempting target that's hard to resist, fully intending on the players stealing the ship.

Why? Because he's planted dozens of trackers and beacons on the ship, all set to trigger about three hours after the ship exits hyperspace - IE, back at the Rebel sector HQ. Suddenly an huge armada of Star Destroyers swoop down on the base, obliterating the rebels and setting back alliance operations throughout that quardant for months.

Major, major victory for the Empire and some serious guilt for the players.

Krad-edis
5 August 2002, 11:05 PM
Originally posted by ALFRED_THE_EWOK
I have experienced the "moron with sack" problem before, you have my symapthies.

lmao!

Looting in Star Wars is picking up a blaster from a stormtrooper if you are out of blaster packs. I can imagine someone utilizing weapons (you know, like what Bruce Willis does in Die Hard), or even possibly grabbing some lightweight armor from a fallen foe (like a helmet or blast vest). Anything other than that is not likely to happen especially if the area is crawling with hostiles.


Originally posted by Paul Klein
I told the player that lugging around the bag would be dangerous. He said "It's kewl! I'll just dr0p it on the ground when we get into a fight!" [/B]

He drops it.......KA-BOOM! Oooops, not so kewl anymore is it? :D

The whole lugging the bag thing has great potential for disaster. The tight squeezes and other things mentioned from other members are all things to take into consideration, but just the idea of running around with a big sack of guns, blasters, explosives, and thermal detonators all while enemies are firing at the character.......KA-BOOM! Need I say more?

Superdog
5 August 2002, 11:05 PM
An interesting solution, when dealing with Imperials being looted, would by this pistol I just read about in Gundarks, the WEG sourcebook about everything that goes boom on command. Anyway there's a pistol with a tracking chip in the handle. Meaning, as long as you have this pistol, the Imps know where you are. It also comes in an explosive variety, where the Imps can cause the gun to explode by pushing a button back on some base somewhere. Just a thought...;)

Agback
6 August 2002, 02:06 AM
Originally posted by Paul Klein
I know that in D&D, looting everything and anything is commonplace and expected. But it simply is NOT in keeping with everything Star Wars is about to act like that (in my opinion).

My first suggestion is to think about the sorts of people on whom you want the PCs in your campaign to be based. Why do those people not engage in looting? Recreate the reasons in your campaign.

One reason not to loot is that it is against the Articles of War: your superiors will court-martial and hang you if they find out you doing it. Similarly, the police will charge you with theft if you rob the bodies even of people you have killed in self-defence. Show your PCs some NPC allies looting. Show them some MPs arresting the looters. Show them the court-martial. Show them the looters being shoved out an airlock. Then show them some investigators from the Criminal Investigation Command interviewing their usual fence to discover whether any more Rebel soldiers have been shifting suspicious goods.

Another reason not to loot is that the loot itself can identify you as the murderer of the people you stole it from. Show your PCs some allies killing enemies and pinching their personal effects. Show them being stopped and searched. Show them being caught because of having identifiable possessions of their victims. Show them being tried and executed. And then stick an Imperial checkpoint on the next road they drive along.

Another reason not to loot is that driving around with your trunk full of guns and armour makes you conspicuous to cops. Another is that it earns you an unsavoury reputation among your allies. Make these things real in your campaign.

Show the players what the circumstances are. And if they insist on ignoring circumstances, let them suffer consequences. Natural, reasonable consequences that are the logical outgrowth of the established features of the campaign. Real people don't boobytrap their own weapons. Neither should any but a tiny psychotic minority of NPCs in your campaign. Nevertheless, many real people find a reason not to loot.

Another reason not to loot is sentiment/image. Show the players a caricarture of their characters: banditti in pretended service of the Rebellion, who as soon as they kill some Imperial troops ignore further prosectuion of their mission in their scramble to snaffle the watches, jewelry, and gold fillings of the people they have shot, not caring whether they are disabled or dead.

Next, think about the fact that Star Wars is supposed to be more about characters than their equipment (and is thus the antithesis of D&D). Give your PCs more things to do that equipment cannot help with. And send them on more shallow-cover missions where they cannot take their equipment along. Employ Rule Zero to remove all masterwork equipment from your campaign, and ignore any options that make better spaceships available for large sums of money. If it becomes less useful to have expensive equipment, your players may gradually become less driven to scrimp and save. And to get the supply side as well as the demand side, be more generous with the equipment you let them have without saving up.

And my final suggestion: stop providing GM support to looting and to dealing with the financial minutiae. Ignore all prices and price lists. Don't tell the PCs how much money they get or how much money anything costs them. Ignore money. If a player wants to buy something you think his character ought to have, say 'Okay, you buy one at a shop'. If the player asks what it costs, say 'It doesn't matter and I don't care.' If a player wants to buy something you don't think his character ought to have, say 'You can't find one for sale' or 'You can't afford it'. If they reply 'It says in the rules they cost X and I have a zillion smolleons', say 'I don't care what it says in the price list: you can't get one.' And if the players complain, tell them that Star Wars is about characters, not their equipment. If a player wants to loot some corpses, say 'Okay, you loot the corpses and collect a swag of blood-stained war booty'. If the player asks what's included, say 'The usual things: wedding rings, heirloom watches, gold teeth...' If the player asks for an itemised list, refuse. Say 'It doesn't matter what the loot is, and I don't care. Stop wasting time and pay attention to the adventure.'

Not only is looting corpses a holdover from D&D, but the whole issue of keeping track of costs and finances is too. You can very easily ignore the issue completely. PCs other than nobles have only ordinary stuff. PC nobles have the special stuff you think is appropriate. That's it.

Regards,


Agback

Agback
6 August 2002, 02:15 AM
Originally posted by The_Anarchisto
IThen, simply make the missions cost more. Make them pay to rent a speeder, and then pay to replace it when the stormies either impound or destroy it. I made my characters have to buy an informant out of a gambling debt - or fight the assorted thugs there to collect - to the tune of $15,000 credits. They didn't stay filthy rich for long.

Is the problem that the characters are filthy rich? Or is the problem that they are filthy looters? What you suggest may make them poor, but it will only encourage them to loot even more assiduously.

Regards,


Agback

Vanger Chevane
6 August 2002, 02:50 PM
If the players wanna whine about "but the book says it cost X and is easily available" remind them that the book doesn't cover the sitaution on a specific planet.

For example, a glass of fresh, unrecycled iced water on Tattooine will easily run 10 - 20 times as much as places like Kuat or Coruscant.

Depending on where they're at, basic items like even blaster pawerpacks can be very rare and/or expensive. Other things may be much more available and/or cheaper than most places.

It's what makes a traders living.

Krad-edis
6 August 2002, 04:43 PM
Originally posted by Superdog
An interesting solution, when dealing with Imperials being looted, would by this pistol I just read about in Gundarks, the WEG sourcebook about everything that goes boom on command. Anyway there's a pistol with a tracking chip in the handle. Meaning, as long as you have this pistol, the Imps know where you are. It also comes in an explosive variety, where the Imps can cause the gun to explode by pushing a button back on some base somewhere. Just a thought...;)

The Imperial Munitions SC-4 Blaster Pistol on page 27 of Gundark's Fantastic Technology: Personal Gear. I agree with Superdog. This blaster may be a solution if the "Duffle bag Bandit" crosses Imperials.

malphas13
14 August 2002, 03:31 PM
Just a point about running around with a sack full of blasters. Don't remind the PC about safety settings etc... Running around with a sack full of plain old guns today is just begging to get shot, as one of them goes off by accident. A sack full of blasters is most definatly going to fire at least once, if he "drops" it at the first sign of trouble, roll for about 25%-50% of the blasters going off at once, he may well have just killed both himself and most of the party... ;)

OverLord
15 August 2002, 07:02 AM
Don't assume the players are to stupid to remove the power packs malphas13.
There is nothing unsafe about running and throwing around empty guns.

malphas13
15 August 2002, 11:02 AM
Well, I don't know the circumstances around this particular incedent. But removing a power pack is a Move equivalent action, if they are pressed for time they may not be able to take them out...

OverLord
15 August 2002, 11:17 AM
If they don't have time to remove the powerpacks, and they still pick up every weapon they find, they deserve all the "accidents" the GameMaster can throw at them! ;)

Darth_Baldran
15 August 2002, 12:56 PM
As Fab said, the ship may be tracked by someone (maybe, the only pirate survivor is thinking "good luck that wasn't my ship; they're going to tell Jabba all about their theft!"), or it may have some kind of security system, as already pointed out.

As for weapons and other stuff, the character will surely have to sell everything on the black market, but then:

1) do they know some black weapons merchant?
2) do they have someone to cover them with aouthorities, in case of failure?
3) shouldn't black weapons marketeers think "Who are these guys? Are thay trying to slice our job beneath our noses?"
4) do they know how to conduct shadowed business?

And, last but not least:

I am XXX the black marketeer, I buy used and stolen weapons, I have 25 years of weapons smuggling behind my back, and I can surely tell you these are all broken or badly worn weapons, so I will gratefully buy the whole lot for the big sum of 25 Credits, will you sell it to me or shall I tell my six barabel bodyguards to shoot you to death?

IMHO

Krad-edis
16 August 2002, 10:54 PM
I may have come up with one idea for two different threads. This might be a way to go for anyone with simple looting compulsion, or as ALFRED_THE_EWOK said, "moron with sack", or looting mania.

It is in the Adventure Hooks posting. I hope that anyone who suffers from "PC overlooting" can treat it with
this (http://holonet.swrpgnetwork.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=8925&perpage=15&pagenumber=2).

It is under the posting "Looters beware". :D

gmjabreson
16 June 2006, 03:56 AM
There are lots and lots of ways to stop looting. A booby trapped body, for one. Nothing like rolling a Stormy over or some other body and activating a frag grenade. "Oy, that was stupid". I do allow the occasional "lifting of Blaster packs, maybe some synthrope dispensors, but thats about it. Anything else is unrecoverable, or don't fit. "Jawa trying on Stormtrooper armor comes to mind".
As for the Black Market. Nothing gets Imperial Interest faster than discovering a large cache of their weapons, and lots of questions begin to get asked about where they came from.
It often can backfire using higher costs on things, sometimes it just makes the characters steal more to cover the cost, or "acquire" the item at a "Five finger Discount," or its equivelant for the species they are playing.
The Grenade under the body Idea will definately slow the looting down, having to develop techniques to counter the event, until one happens to be a thermal detonator.....

WookieWhomper
16 June 2006, 09:37 AM
Originally posted by Grimace
For the weapons, you can work it almost the same. They can only sell to black marketeers, and those guys are never trustworthy or friendly. What happens when one of those guys goes "Hey, deez guns are some that I poichased jus' las' month. You must be the ones raidin' my warehouses! Get 'im boys!"

HA!! I love this idea, thats brilliant!


Originally posted by Agback
And if the players complain, tell them that Star Wars is about characters, not their equipment.

...SNIP...

Say 'It doesn't matter what the loot is, and I don't care. Stop wasting time and pay attention to the adventure.'

Not only is looting corpses a holdover from D&D, but the whole issue of keeping track of costs and finances is too. You can very easily ignore the issue completely. PCs other than nobles have only ordinary stuff. PC nobles have the special stuff you think is appropriate. That's it.

Good point, I've never liked having to keep track of individual monetary amounts, unless the game youre playing is about merchants or bankers, its really not important is it?

gmjabreson
16 June 2006, 01:12 PM
I think looting is ok, when it is necessary. If you're running around in a fight with no weapons and pick one up off a dead guy to defend yourself, that's fine with me. But then again that isn't looting. I don't mind dividing up gear off dead ones, "IF, and I mean IF, it is mission essential. I'm not gonna leave the plasticene thermite behind with the dead demo expert, no way.

WookieWhomper
16 June 2006, 10:08 PM
Well grabing some ammo to replace your empty clips or taking that data pad the imperical officer was carrying doesnt really count as looting.

Looting is going from body to body taking anything of value or that could be sold off at a later date. Thats the kind of behavior that is inappropriate to SW.

gmjabreson
17 June 2006, 04:03 AM
agreed. Oh, I don't mind the lifting of a credit chip or the code cylinders, either.

Faraer
17 June 2006, 08:21 AM
Huh, old thread.

Ways to prevent looting:

Talk to the players and make sure they understand what the fictional mode of the campaign is. No looting in fairytales. Make it clear that this is Star Wars, not D&D. Point out that loot isn't exciting and doesn't help them in the game. You may have to work at breaking the knee-jerk 'imaginary money = good' response. Talk to them about it again.

Then support that in your GMing. Make sure that the campaign and its characters and situations really are more exciting than the acquisition of money. Give them NPC examples that make them enjoy being heroes and not scavengers. Make the campaign exciting so they don't want to hang around picking stuff up off the floor.

Don't encourage them to want loot. Don't have expensive weapons or ships available that are more effective than cheaper ones. A blaster should be a blaster, it's the character that should matter. If an item is important to the campaign, its acquisition should hang on adventure and negotiation. Deal with wealth abstractly rather than accountancy-style.

Use the encumbrance rules and penalize with XP not playing in the spirit of Star Wars. But don't rely on in-game negative reinforcement: communication works better than manipulation.

Kairn
17 June 2006, 12:37 PM
I like many of the in-game ideas presented by Krad-edis and Agback...
Here's a crunchy solution. I had similiar problems with looting, but then I started using the 'credit line' rules from this website. It really changed the focus of the game. All of a sudden, PCs could easily afford grenades and ammo, and individual creds didn't matter.

Wow that sounded like some sort of sales pitch...!

gmjabreson
18 June 2006, 03:08 PM
I like having one or two guys in a special forces group being snipers, with a wide assortment of weapons for the rest of the group, depending on their specialization.

themuffinman1201
18 June 2006, 06:04 PM
My GM always has weapons from our more powerful enemies conveinently break when we kill them. Example: We are fighting a Dark Jedi and his apprentice. The apprentice is struck down, but is still alive. Our Jedi wanted to pick up the apprentice's lightsaber and pull and Anakin on the Dark Jedi. Before he can the Dark Jedi force lightnings the apprentice because he has failed him. That was the most original. He's also made vibroaxes shatter from a 2 foot drop. :(

Mad Tech
18 June 2006, 09:01 PM
In the campaign I run, the characters are agents working for Imperial Intelligence. They usually don't do much looting except the occasional trophy or items of particular value. I had a character nab a dead pirate's credstick which had a few thousand credits on it. Another character grabbed some stolen gems (about a 100K worth) from a pirate gang which he sold for 50K later. They also took a starship from a defeated enemy and sold it for a few thousand credits. But they don't go overboard on looting. Plus, they would have to explain to their superiors if they came back dragging bags of loot.

But in my opinion, even if characters had millions of credits, there's only so much they can do with it. They could buy a mansion and a nice starship and some vehicles, but unless they retire the mansion would never be used and if they stay on their capital ship all the time, they won't be doing much adventuring.

Mad Tech

gmjabreson
19 June 2006, 03:26 AM
Intelligence officers don't "loot". They gather "intel". What better way to get intel from the bodies of dead enemies. Papers, clothing, and equipment of enemy troops can tell you alot, which you then can report to superiors. If an Imperial Intel Officer didn't "loot", I'd be worried.

schnarre
19 June 2006, 03:53 PM
I had a game with a PC lugging a bag full of blasters as well. However, they did so from hired guns belonging to a crime boss I drew up:daala:. Now this crime boss made a living selling illegally-modified droids, & was able to track down the players with little effort. Next thing the PCs know, an EG-series Power Droid comes down the hall: the droid stops nearby (a PC thought "Yeah, we can use one of those!"). Before the party can say "Stang," a compartment opens on the droid, which it turns out to the PCs' chagrin was a built-in flamethrower. The jet of flame roasted 2 of the PCs with emphasis on the one with the bag. The resulting KABOOM could be heard miles away:D :D :D !

IzVenjari
19 June 2006, 07:30 PM
It all depends how you are playing the game...

Heroic characters who wish to do no wrong - well, they couldn't really go around looting could they...tho confiscating weapons for the protection of the general public might be in order.

If you are a low-life scoundrel - well, acquisition is everything ain't it :D - possessions and knowledge equal power and leverage.

Sometimes, if you have survived a real hard mission, getting a reward is nice - eg, cool stuff looted from beaten enemies.

And if it gets out of hand, well, there are plenty of suggestions in this thread on how to limit it. :)

Just my two pennies worth..

Darth Bile
29 June 2006, 02:28 PM
just one question, how do you expect the characters to pay for recharging power packs, restocking their ship if they have one, pay for hotels, dinners and stuff, get drinks at bars, taxi services and stuff without looting? now i agree there should be a limit to what kind of stuff they should loot, but unless they are getting paid plus expense's, they gonna need to loot some stuff to cover their costs on the adventure.

schnarre
29 June 2006, 04:49 PM
If the characters are involved with the Rebellion/New Republic, I've seen the party allocated a certain amount of funds in some adventures.

gmjabreson
29 June 2006, 04:57 PM
Aye, but the Rebel Alliance doesn't pay as good as the Empire, or being a Pirate would. I think what alot of us are saying is that we allow a certain ammount of Looting, just not to the point of over burdening yourselves or time consumption. If the players are more worried about looting all the way down to Stormy Skivvies, and less worried about the reinforcements that are sure to be on the way, then there is definately a problem.

boccelounge
29 June 2006, 06:23 PM
Originally posted by Faraer
Ways to prevent looting...

Don't encourage them to want loot. Don't have expensive weapons or ships available that are more effective than cheaper ones. A blaster should be a blaster, it's the character that should matter. If an item is important to the campaign, its acquisition should hang on adventure and negotiation. Deal with wealth abstractly rather than accountancy-style.

With all respect to the varied and valuable responses to this question, IMO all that really needs to be said is quoted above: if you want players to stop over-valuing material acquisitions, then (simply) stop giving them NEW and BETTER materials to acquire.

Stop coming up with "equipment guides" and "customized gear." Stop "statting up" dozens and dozens and hundreds of new vehicles. Stop making new "stuff" for them to WANT.

If (and this is a big "if") you want them to stop "looting" and start concentrating on your well-crafted, heroic, epic, memorable storyline, then, well, start working on well-crafted, heroic, epic, memorable storylines.

The game plays the way you (the GM) play it. If you want item-obsessed players, then keep introducing all the Newest! and Best! new weapons and vehicles and armors and ships and droids and whatever... but if you want epic Star Wars stories, then work on just that: stories.


2cr. ;)

Ardent
29 June 2006, 07:38 PM
If your players are worrying about recharging their powerpacks, there's no reason to loot the whole rifle now, is there?

That aside, the way I've always handled it is that the ship has an armory and the armory has the necessary equipment to recharge their powerpacks. Occasionally, through misfortune or madness they've run out of ammo. They got creative. Which, honestly, is what this game is all about, so I see no reason they shouldn't be pushed to flex their mental muscles once in a while.

I've run entire campaigns where the players never see credits change hands the entire time, never worry about paying for or buying anything. Then I ran our Fringe game, where credit accumulation was sort of the subquest for the entire three sessions, and it was kind of like running D&D. Not bad, per se, but not "epic Star Wars."

Grell
2 July 2006, 11:35 AM
In one of our scenarios, player characters are greatly encouraged to donate looted weapons and equipment to the soldiers of the backwater planet they help protect from slavers and remnants of the Empire. They sometimes even get paid, but never much and certainly not market price.

gmjabreson
2 July 2006, 12:02 PM
Remember though, that not all planets are civilized. On those planets, weapons to fight the Empire back are in high value. Those who are fighting might not be able to pay in the usual way. Instead of credits, they can offer food stores, or other such items. But is it worth hauling around massive bundles of weapons. More importantly, how better would the team get supplies and payment than training those unfortunates how to fight the Empire?
Looting can slow the game down for that, but if making a weapons gathering part of the adventure/campaign, it could make things more interesting. Cause not only do they have to "acquire" the weapons. But they have to get off the planet as well and deliver them.

Darth Winter
4 July 2006, 04:11 AM
when it comes to stuff on enemies i always have it that most of the good stuff is to damaged to be used again, power packs maybe a blaster if we are against a sith well a lens or something remains the gaurds helmete seems salvagable ect, make them have 2 work for really good stuff like the ship it was docked for repaire it seems heaverly damaged most of the systems are of line due to corruption of memory files but is still space worthy it should be able to get you 2 the next plannet thats about it so they have 2 fix it. because the good ships i mean really good ones would have decent scurity settings and be well gaurded who wants to lose a good ship? and who would really steel a broken one? if that makes sence

wolverine
4 July 2006, 09:54 AM
Originally posted by gmjabreson
Remember though, that not all planets are civilized. On those planets, weapons to fight the Empire back are in high value. Those who are fighting might not be able to pay in the usual way. Instead of credits, they can offer food stores, or other such items. But is it worth hauling around massive bundles of weapons. More importantly, how better would the team get supplies and payment than training those unfortunates how to fight the Empire?
Looting can slow the game down for that, but if making a weapons gathering part of the adventure/campaign, it could make things more interesting. Cause not only do they have to "acquire" the weapons. But they have to get off the planet as well and deliver them.

And they also have to come up with a way to CARRY it all...

gmjabreson
4 July 2006, 04:28 PM
well the players can always have them picked up when they get to the destination at the ship. The recipients would then either have to be plentiful enough to carry them off by hand, or have pack animals. But as Han and Lando say, "It's not MY fault."

Tav Kord
15 July 2006, 01:05 PM
I've always liked the idea of having proceeds from "generic" loot go into an untracked slushfund, from which all your standard living costs are paid... i.e. if you loot some pistols, and sell them, the money goes towards paying of travel/food/maintenance expenses. The only purchases I track are major item purchases, like SuperNiftyGun-O-Matic Mark V's and stuff.

wolverine
15 July 2006, 08:46 PM
Prob is, after a while, they won't be able to sell what they loot. Firstly, the ISB will be noticing the large number of sales /purchases of imperial weaponry, and crack down on it, and secondly i doubt there are that many people out there willing to get on the imps bad side to buy a few weapons..